nontoxic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nontoxic

adjective Referring to that which does not cause damage or harm

non·tox·ic

(non-toksik)
Denotes substance that is not poisonous.

nontoxic

(nŏn-tŏk′sĭk) [L. non, not, + Gr. toxikon, poison]
Not poisonous or productive of poison. A list of substances considered generally nontoxic is provided in the Appendix.
References in periodicals archive ?
Using a modular approach (factory-built pieces shipped for on-site assembly), two recently completed energy-efficient and nontoxic homes were approximately 20 percent less expensive to build than comparable conventional ones.
Taught by Pat Snyder, the workshop deals with nontoxic photopolymer printmaking, which is safer for the artist than traditional printmaking with its dangerous varnishes and solvents.
"There is a great need to develop new, nontoxic alternatives for the commercial products we regularly use," said Ogunseitan, whose research seeks to mitigate environmental pollutants that contribute to human disease and ecosystem degradation.
Level One--The most sustainable, nontoxic, earth-friendly level.
I should have specified nontoxic softeners in the text of the article, since there are plenty out there!
Recombinant human thyrotropin before radioiodine therapy was associated with a 35% greater reduction in volume of nontoxic nodular goiters than that achieved with radioiodine alone, but with a fivefold increase in the rate of hypothyroidism, Danish researchers reported in the first large, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial of this therapy for nontoxic nodular goiter.
Now, materials scientists have quietly taken aim at one common use of that harmful substance by creating a nontoxic alloy with the potential to replace a coating containing chromium.
Every new glaze or underglaze is completely nontoxic and safe.
"Because soy candles are not made from petroleum, they are soot-free, biodegradable, and nontoxic."
Now the University of Manchester in England and the company Green Biologics are developing a biologically based cleaner, TP-GUM[TM], that is cost-effective and nontoxic. The new product, which uses enzymes to break down the chemical structure of chewing gum at low temperatures and pressure, is easier to use and less damaging to surfaces than conventional gum cleanup methods.
Wit your nontoxic markers, copy the illustration on this spread to the bathing cap.
One alternative management strategy might be to use a nontoxic endophyte that has negligible production of the toxic alkaloids, such as ergovaline, that are reported to cause negative effects on animals (West et al., 2001; Bouton et al., 2002).