nonsuppurative


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nonsuppurative

pertaining to inflammation without the production of pus, e.g. nonsuppurative polyarthritis of lambs and calves.
References in periodicals archive ?
This protocol recommends no intervention for nonsuppurative lymphadenitis and needle aspiration for suppurative local lymphadenitis.
The morphologic findings of nonsuppurative inflammation accompanied by proliferating mesothelium was highly suggestive of Enterocytozoon infection and could be confirmed by ISH and PCR.
Severe nonsuppurative meningitis (with > 20 layers of lymphohistiocytic cells), perineuritis, and encephalomyelitis were found within the nervous system.
There was a nonsuppurative ganglioneuritis in the 1 cervical dorsal root ganglion examined.
Mild nonsuppurative meningitis was found in 2 of 7 animals, and vasculitis in the choroid plexus was found in 1 of these.
There were no clinical signs or gross necropsy findings suggestive of the cause of death; however, microscopic lesions were consistent with WNV infection, including nonsuppurative encephalitis and myocardial, pancreatic, and splenic necrosis.
Microscopically, this bird had a mild nonsuppurative encephalitis.
Similarly, nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis is commonly found in experimentally induced infection (15), and the florid neurologic signs noted in field cases in the Redlands 2008 outbreak (4) might merely reflect the normal spectrum of HeV in horses.
Histologic review demonstrated moderate multifocal subacute vasculitis and nonsuppurative encephalitis.
Light microscopic examination of hematoxylin and eosin-stained formalin-fixed wax-embedded cerebellum and cerebrum sections of the mare showed mild to moderate nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis, with olfactory lobe and cortex showing the most pronounced lesions.
The brains had multifocal nonsuppurative meningoencephalitis with perivascular and vascular infiltrates of mononuclear cells and gliose foci (Figure, panels A, B).
The spectrum of infection caused by Streptococcus pyogenes varies widely from invasive disease, such as bacteremia, sepsis, necrotizing fasciitis (NF), and STSS, to noninvasive infection, most commonly pharyngitis with suppurative complications, such as otitis media, and nonsuppurative complications, such as acute rheumatic fever (ARF) and acute glomerulonephritis (APSGN).