nonresponse bias

nonresponse bias

(in epidemiology) errors that may develop when a part of those selected and identified as study subjects cannot or will not participate in the study. The bias may occur when the group of nonrespondents differs systematically from respondents with respect to exposure or disease status. To minimize this bias, a high participation rate is necessary, or a survey is made of nonresponders to determine whether or how they might differ with regard to the risk of disease or exposure.

nonresponse bias

(nŏn″rĭ-spŏns′)
Distortion introduced into a research investigation by incomplete collection of data from all possible respondents. This bias is most likely to influence the results of a study when those who do not participate or who refuse to be sampled have other crucial characteristics that the study is designed to identify.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, we think a nonresponse bias explanation will only go so far.
As not all consumers provided ratings to survey questions, potential nonresponse bias should be considered for the consumer rating data at this website.
Although the data were adjusted to minimize nonresponse bias based on known characteristics of sampled facilities and patients, the possibility of residual nonresponse bias exists.
The work performed under this solicitation involves reviewing and assessing the recent administrations of OJJDP~s National Survey of Children~s Exposure to Violence (NatSCEV) and making recommendations on items that will be included in the survey instrument, frame development, sampling plan, modes of data collection, strategies for reducing nonresponse bias, reference periods for trend analysis, and viability of supporting various subgroup estimates.
If the choice not to participate is not random, this is a nonresponse bias.
However, a nonresponse bias is a concern with this response rate.
Furthermore, the weighting method used for adjustment might not have fully controlled for nonresponse bias, they said.
05), this suggests nonresponse bias was not a concern.
Therefore, in the absence of non-responder questionnaires, key constructs can be compared among early and late responses to determine the existence of a nonresponse bias.
Two types of bias were of concern and were examined before further analysis was conducted: nonresponse bias and common method bias.
Previous studies have used comparisons between early and late responders to look at nonresponse bias (Dooley & Lindner, 2003; Jordan, Walker, Kent, & Inoue, 2011), a method based upon the assumption that late respondents are most similar to nonrespondents (Armstrong & Overton, 1977; Miller & Smith, 1983).