nonresponse bias

nonresponse bias

(in epidemiology) errors that may develop when a part of those selected and identified as study subjects cannot or will not participate in the study. The bias may occur when the group of nonrespondents differs systematically from respondents with respect to exposure or disease status. To minimize this bias, a high participation rate is necessary, or a survey is made of nonresponders to determine whether or how they might differ with regard to the risk of disease or exposure.

nonresponse bias

(nŏn″rĭ-spŏns′)
Distortion introduced into a research investigation by incomplete collection of data from all possible respondents. This bias is most likely to influence the results of a study when those who do not participate or who refuse to be sampled have other crucial characteristics that the study is designed to identify.
References in periodicals archive ?
However, a nonresponse bias is a concern with this response rate.
Furthermore, the weighting method used for adjustment might not have fully controlled for nonresponse bias, they said.
Two types of bias were of concern and were examined before further analysis was conducted: nonresponse bias and common method bias.
Previous studies have used comparisons between early and late responders to look at nonresponse bias (Dooley & Lindner, 2003; Jordan, Walker, Kent, & Inoue, 2011), a method based upon the assumption that late respondents are most similar to nonrespondents (Armstrong & Overton, 1977; Miller & Smith, 1983).
The first several chapters deal with the basics of collecting reliable data, including how to get a good sample, correct for nonresponse bias, and understand types of potential error.
It is nonresponse bias that is the focus of this editorial and it is also the subject of the paper by Halbesleben and Whitman (2013) that this editorial accompanies.
Neither the subscale scores nor the overall scale score differed between respondents to the first postal mailing and the second postal mailing, which may help to offset potential concerns about nonresponse bias.
Since only 63% of hospitals responded to the AHA's Annual Survey's Information Technology Supplement, there is the potential for a nonresponse bias in our results.
Nonresponse bias was assessed by comparing the responses of the early and late respondents based on the method presented by Smith et al.
There is empirical evidence that the reduced risks were attributable partly to nonresponse bias (Vrijheid et al.
Assessing response rates and nonresponse bias in Web and paper surveys.
To determine whether nonresponse bias affected the results, we also calculated all PPVs after adjusting for potential nonresponse bias (results not shown).