nonprofit hospital


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

nonprofit hospital

A hospital that is exempt from paying income and property taxes. In such a facility, funds earned are reinvested in the hospital and its services instead of being paid as dividends to shareholders.
See also: hospital
References in periodicals archive ?
While the document stated that it was not proposed legislation, it suggested various alternatives that should be considered in drafting legislation to reform nonprofit hospital tax exemptions.
92) Private inurement occurs whenever persons having a personal and private interest in a nonprofit hospital receive benefits disproportionate to their contributions to the entity.
Nonprofit doesn't necessarily mean pro-poor patient," Grassley said last week as he released a 116-page summary of responses the Finance Committee received to a questionnaire that asked 10 large nonprofit hospitals to describe their charity programs.
If a nonprofit hospital generates a surplus in addition to its provision of community benefits, it cannot distribute the "profit" to its owners.
But Harold Pollack, faculty chair of Health Administration Studies at the University of Chicago, cautions that the debate should take into account the increasing financial burden that nonprofit hospitals are shouldering.
Dozens of federal class-action lawsuits have been filed recently against more than 300 nonprofit hospitals and hospital systems in 20 states.
Both for-profit and nonprofit hospital conversions were found to result in improved financial performance by generating higher revenues per case and reducing Medicare costs.
The laboratory manager of a nonprofit hospital in North Carolina contends that versatility, indeed, is the key to success.
nonprofit hospitals, driving the highest consolidation activity since 2000 and increasing the focus on the operating environment and efficiencies, according to a new Fitch Ratings report.
They are not, however, more "richly compensated" than executives of the state's publicly traded companies, which may be appropriate if Brill is correct in his assertion that nonprofit hospitals are more "akin to low-risk, must-have public utilities" than the domain of "high-risk entrepreneurs.
Do nonprofit hospital leaders need to be proactive in telling their story to their various publics?

Full browser ?