statistics

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statistics

 [stah-tis´tiks]
1. a collection of numerical data.
2. the mathematical science dealing with the collection, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data using the theory of probability, especially with methods for drawing inferences about characteristics of a population from examination of a random sample.
vital statistics data, usually collected by governmental bodies, detailing the rates of birth, death, disease, marriage, and divorce in a population.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks),
1. A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts that are numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly analysis of the probability that the resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
2. The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation.

statistics

/sta·tis·tics/ (stah-tis´tiks)
1. a collection of numerical data.
2. a discipline devoted to the collection, analysis, and interpretation of numerical data using the theory of probability.

vital statistics  data detailing the rates of birth, death, disease, marriage, and divorce in a population.

statistics

[stətis′tiks]
a mathematic science concerned with measuring, classifying, and analyzing objective information.

statistics

Statistics
1. A collection of datapoints or numerical values that can be categorized and subject to analysis; statistics are the raw material on which conclusions about cause-and-effect relationships are based.
2. The field that formally studies cause-and-effect relationships; the systematic collection, classification, and mathematical compilation of data vis-á-vis amount, range, frequency, or prevalence; those methods for planning experiments, obtaining data, and organizing, summarizing, presenting, analyzing, interpreting, and drawing conclusions. See Actuarial statistics, Coefficient of variation, Cusum statistics, Descriptive statistics, Health statistics, Mean, Standard deviation, t test.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks)
1. A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts that are numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly analysis of the probability that the resulting empiric findings are due to chance.
2. The science and art of collecting, summarizing, and analyzing data that are subject to random variation.

statistics

See VITAL STATISTICS.

sta·tis·tics

(stă-tis'tiks)
A collection of numeric values, items of information, or other facts numerically grouped into definite classes and subject to analysis, particularly of the probability that resulting empiric findings are due to chance.

statistics,

n the branch of mathematics that gathers, arranges, condenses, coordinates, and mathematically manipulates obtained facts so that the numerical relationships between those facts may be seen clearly and freed from anomalies resulting from chance factors.
statistics, descriptive,
n.pl the statistics used to describe only the observed group or sample from which they were derived; summary statistics such as percent, averages, and measures of variability that are computed on a particular group of individuals.
statistics, inference,
n.pl the inferences made regarding characteristics or general principles about an unseen population based on the characteristics of the observed sample. Statistical findings from a sample are generalized to pertain to the entire population. The process of drawing inferences, making predictions, and testing significance are examples of inferential statistics.
statistics, nonparametric,
n.pl the sta-tistical methods used when the statistician cannot assume that the variable being studied is normally distributed in a population. Also called
distribution-free statistics.

statistics

1. numerical facts pertaining to a particular subject or body of objects.
2. the science dealing with the collection, tabulation and analysis of numerical facts.

inferential statistics
conclusions, usually quantitative, drawn from an analysis of data.
salvage statistics
statistical technique used in an attempt to derive some useful information from a poorly designed or poorly executed experiment.
vital statistics
see vital statistics.

Patient discussion about statistics

Q. What are the known statistics of Autism: Here is a question which needs a very detailed reply please. What are the known statistics of Autism: incidence, cost and ratio?

A. for more statistical information here are 2 sites:
http://www.autism-society.org/site/PageServer?pagename=about_whatis_factsstats

and here is the CDC site link:
http://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/dd/addmprevalence.htm

Q. Do you know if Propecia can truly stop hair loss and even grow back hair. do you have any statistics about it? do you know if there are any side effects to this medication?

A. it does work but there is some side affects, as in E.D. while you are on the med.

Q. What is the statistic number of women having breast cancer or under the threat of having breast cancer? where would i find a good , and reliable info about the disease ?

A. it is said that today 1 out of any 8 women will have breast cancer. there are also men who has breast cancer but the numbers are considerably lower.
about a good source of info- the site that doctoradhi gave you is pretty good, and you can use also the national medical library link:
http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/breastcancer.html#cat22

good luck!

More discussions about statistics
References in periodicals archive ?
1986, Mathematical Nonparametric Statistics (New York: Gordon and Breach).
Nonparametric Statistics is now integrated into mainstream hypothesis testing in Chapters 9 and 10, rather than in a separate chapter (formerly Chapter 15 in the Fourth Edition).
Cohen takes an accessible, conversation approach when introducing the conceptual foundations and basic of statistic procedures, a practice he continues with material on frequency tables, graphs, distributions, measures of central tendency and variability, standardized scores and the normal distribution, hypothesis testing with one or two samples, internal estimation and the t distribution, the t test for two independent sample means, statistical power and effect size, linear correlation and regression, the matched t test, one-way independent ANOVA and two-way ANOVA, multiple regression and its connection to ANOVA, nonparametric statistics, chi-square tests and statistical tests for ordinal data.
The conventional method in nonparametric statistics to treat tied observations is to set the rank of each of them to the average of the ranks that these observations would have if they were not tied observations.
Combining mathematical analysis with practical implementations, Smoothing of Multivariate Data is an excellent book for courses in multivariate analysis, data analysis, and nonparametric statistics at the upper-undergraduate and graduate levels.
Nonparametric statistics with applications to science and engineering.
He works through statistical parameters in terms of the measures of central tendency and variation, standard scores, the z distribution, hypothesis testing, inferential statistics, including baloney detection, correlation and regression, the t test for independent and dependent groups, analysis of variance for a variety of situations, functional analysis of variance, nonparametric statistics and other statistical parameters and tests.
When the populations did not have a gaussian distribution, nonparametric statistics were used to obtain the reference interval.