nonoperative management


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nonoperative management

(non?op'e-ra-tiv),

NOM

The treatment of patients who have suffered serious illnesses, injuries, or trauma without urgent surgery, as with a period of fluid resuscitation, stabilization of vital signs, antibiotics, and analgesics. It is used for some relatively stable patients who have experienced blunt trauma and gunshot wounds and is sometimes used for orthopedic injuries and vascular diseases. Synonym: selective nonoperative management
References in periodicals archive ?
There is only limited evidence to show that ultrasound is useful in diagnosing DDH in children younger than 6 months of age," said Kishore Mulpuri, MD, chair of the AAOS Clinical Practice Guideline Detection and Nonoperative Management of Pediatric DDH in Infants Up to 6 Months of Age work group.
Type III fractures have a better outcome with nonoperative management than type II fractures, perhaps due to the large contact area at the fracture line with cancellous bone.
Nonoperative management of symptomatic urachal anomalies.
Nonoperative management is generally accepted as a treatment strategy for nasopharyngeal cancer characterized by destruction of the skull base.
Nonoperative management of blunt hepatic trauma is the treatment of choice for hemodynamically stable patients.
DuPriest CM (1993): Nonoperative management of lumbar spinal stenosis.
Nonoperative management of blunt liver trauma: the value of follow-up abdominal computed tomography scans.
Our patient elected observation and nonoperative management after definitive diverticulectomy and is NED at a postoperative interval of two years.
of Colorado School of Medicine), 176 contributed chapters begin with basic considerations for clinical practice, basic vascular science, and the basics of the vascular diagnostic laboratory, vascular imaging, arterial diseases, and bleeding and clotting; subsequent coverage includes the many aspects of nonoperative management and surgical considerations for various conditions.
Nonoperative management of severe blunt liver injuries appears to be the best strategy of caring for hemodynamically stable patients, according to findings from a retrospective review of 561 patients.
Reviews the differential diagnosis and surgical management of CMT and provides a detailed, comprehensive approach to the nonoperative management of CMT by bringing together a wide range of related materials under one cover.