nonoperative management


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nonoperative management

(non?op'e-ra-tiv),

NOM

The treatment of patients who have suffered serious illnesses, injuries, or trauma without urgent surgery, as with a period of fluid resuscitation, stabilization of vital signs, antibiotics, and analgesics. It is used for some relatively stable patients who have experienced blunt trauma and gunshot wounds and is sometimes used for orthopedic injuries and vascular diseases. Synonym: selective nonoperative management
References in periodicals archive ?
Demographic data of the patients undergoing nonoperative management and the results of the parameters evaluated in this study are shown in Table 3.
Our two cases had good clinical outcomes from periods of nonoperative management which was instilled by the multidisciplinary team that includes orthopaedic surgeons.
Nonoperative management of pancreatic trauma is on the rise [11, 12].
The technique is the most commonly used surgical procedure for early-stage osteonecrosis and is superior to nonoperative management. A research from Europe showed the results of CD in different ARCO stages.[48] ARCO stage I (reversible early stage) or stage II (irreversible early stage) with necrotic lesions located on the medial side or central lesions and area of less than 30% of the femoral head showed better results than those in conservative therapy; CD can be used as a short-term pain relief option in ARCO stage III.
Nonoperative management strategies have been suggested for the management of flail chest since the 1950s and most trauma surgeons still follow this approach today.
In blunt abdominal trauma, including severe solid organ injuries, selective nonoperative management has become the standard of care.
Patient outcomes in the operative and nonoperative management of high-grade spondylolisthesis in children.
Similarly, Peskun and Whelan (17) summarized the results in the literature regarding operative versus the nonoperative management of multiligament knee injuries.
Our study is to know the efficacy of nonoperative management.
Sasson et al., "The evidence for nonoperative management of visceral artery dissections: a single-center experience," Annals of Vascular Surgery, vol.
There are three treatment options described in the literature: nonoperative management with fluid resuscitation and hemodynamic monitoring, interventional radiologic splenic artery embolization, and surgery [2, 6-8, 10].