nonnutritive sucking


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sucking

 [suk´ing]
moving the lips and tongue in such a way as to create suction and draw fluids or solids into the mouth. See also sucking reflex.
nonnutritive sucking in the nursing interventions classification, a nursing intervention defined as the provision of sucking opportunities for the infant who is gavage fed or who can receive nothing by mouth.

non·nu·tri·tive suck·ing

(non-nū'tri-tiv sŭk'ing)
The sucking patterns used by infants to self-calm, regulate, organize, and explore; not associated with feeding.

non·nu·tri·tive suck·ing

(non-nū'tri-tiv sŭk'ing)
The sucking patterns used by infants to self-calm, regulate, organize, and explore; not associated with feeding.
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References in periodicals archive ?
During the intervention phase, nonnutritive sucking training and oral stimulation intervention were performed for 30 minutes each, and feeding was provided equally as during the baseline phase.
(6,9) It seems that another factor unassociated to social class has occurred, namely the greater participation of women in the workforce, with a consequent reduction in breastfeeding and greater susceptibility to the adoption of nonnutritive sucking habits.
Fox, "Behavioral and physiologic effects of nonnutritive sucking during gavage feeding in preterm infants," Pediatric Research, vol.
Rosenblatt, "Nonnutritive sucking habits, dental malocclusions, and facial morphology in Brazilian children: a longitudinal study," European Journal of Orthodontics, vol.
Nonnutritive sucking (NNS) reduces pain and distress responses in infants undergoing heelstick (Field & Goldson, 1984), intravenous catheter insertion (Miller & Anderson, 1993), and circumcision (Gunnar, Fisch, & Malone, 1984).
The nonnutritive sucking enhances the letdown reflex, improves mother-child bonding, shortens the transition time to breast-feeding, and lengthens the duration of breast-feeding, results of studies show.
Human newborns respond differently to sweet solutions than to water or nonnutritive sucking: they suck more slowly for sweeter taste but with fewer and shorter interruptions and heart rates increase for sweet stimuli.
Effects of oral stimulation and oral support on nonnutritive sucking and feeding performance in preterm infants.
Give something for nonnutritive sucking: A pacifier or fingertip is good.
Swaddling, nonnutritive sucking, slow rocking, and gentle transitions are calming techniques discussed here.