nonmaleficence


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nonmaleficence

 [non-mah-lef´ĭ-sens]
a principle of bioethics that asserts an obligation not to inflict harm intentionally. It is useful in dealing with difficult issues surrounding the terminally or seriously ill and injured. Some philosophers combine nonmaleficence and beneficence, considering them a single principle.

non·ma·lef·i·cence

(non'ma-lef'ĭ-sens),
The ethical principle of doing no harm, based on the Hippocratic maxim, primum non nocere, first do no harm.
[non- + L. maleficencia, evildoing, fr. male, badly, wrongly, + facio, to do, act]

nonmaleficence

Medical ethics A central guiding principle of the ethical practice of medicine, first expressed by Hippocrates, and translated into Latin as primum non nocere, first do no harm

non·ma·lef·i·cence

(non'mă-lef'i-sĕns)
Ethical principle of doing no harm.
[non- + L. maleficencia, evildoing, fr. male, badly, wrongly, + facio, to do, act]
References in periodicals archive ?
Structuring principles for decision-making include considerations of client "autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, justice, fidelity, and veracity" (ACA, 2014, p.
This is an example of beneficence, or doing good for the patient; and nonmaleficence, which is preventing harm (Smith & Lammers, 2014).
When deciding whether to prescribe for performance enhancement in the absence of psychopathology, we suggest first carefully considering how to maintain the ethical value of nonmaleficence by weighing both the potential physical and psychologic harms of prescribing as well as the legal risks and rules of applicable sport governing bodies.
Having a suggestive and inspiring quality, the General Principles section recommends that psychologists aim at "Beneficence and Nonmaleficence, Fidelity and Responsibility, Integrity, Justice and Respect for People's Rights and Dignity".
Complex discharge situations in which patients have questionable decisionmaking capacity cause nurses distress as they feel torn between patient autonomy and the principles of beneficence or nonmaleficence (Bingham, 2012).
Beneficence requires the researcher to minimize harm (nonmaleficence) and maximize benefits.
Strikes in Support of the Concepts of Justice, beneficence, and Nonmaleficence
The four ethical principles of autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence, and justice provide a set of abstract norms to facilitate ethical decision-making.
Childress in 1979, which provided the four principles of the Georgetown Mantra of Bioethics: autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, and justice.
(13) According to Sandler, the principal environmental virtues are compassion, care for nature, nonmaleficence, ecological sensitivity, and restitutive (ecological) justice.