nondominant


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nondominant

(non?dom'i-nint)
In neurology, that hemisphere of the brain that does not control speech or the preferentially used hand. See: dominance, cerebral
References in periodicals archive ?
What: Ana-Maurine Lara examines the meaning of "home" to nondominant racial and cultural groups, employing long walks punctuated by talks and creation of "historical markers"
microaggression: a subtle but offensive comment or action directed at a minority or other nondominant group that is often unintentional or unconsciously reinforces a stereotype.
I don't have an answer, but the results are truly disheartening for those of us who write in nondominant languages.
It involves a new social and pedagogical imagination about how youth and people from nondominant communities can become designers of their own futures.
1998), "Unilateral Postural Control of the Functionally Dominant and Nondominant Extremities of Healthy Subjects", Journal of Athletic Training, Oct-Dec; 33(4): 319-322.
The degree to which people pursue their cultural heritage and how much they participate in the larger society are the dominant indicators of acculturation; the combination of strategies, between dominant and nondominant groups, interact according to four different patterns.
The motor function included scores on the Fingertapping [for dominant (FT 1) and nondominant (FT 2) hands] and the Santa Ana test [for dominant (SA 1) and nondominant (SA 2) hands].
During the run of the exhibition, Kotak made herself readily available to those present, talking with visitors, writing (in gold pen and, as recommended by her psychiatrist, using her nondominant hand), and exercising, inviting her audience to join her.
In the pregame layup line, Lau ren's teammates shot with their nondominant hands, in tribute to Lauren, whose cancer has affected her right side and thus her own dominant shooting hand.
our view is that an advanced prosthesis, like the DEKA arm, should assume the role of a nondominant limb, which is capable of skilled activity, though generally less adept than the dominant limb.
If you're not sold yet, consider the study by Indiana University ergonomics experts who found that using the nondominant hand to reach for things like a cup of water while sitting on a stability ball results in different firing patterns in the muscles of the legs to stabilize the body.