nondirective


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nondirective

(nŏn′dĭ-rĕk′tĭv, -dī-)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a psychotherapeutic or counseling technique in which the therapist takes an unobtrusive role in order to encourage free expression and problem resolution by the client or patient.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nondirective coaching is powerful when people have what they need inside them already.
If the communication style seems to be only a modified version of cooperative or nondirective, staff may question leadership and the direction of their work and overall mission of the organization.
Nondirective meditation activates default mode network and areas associated with memory retrieval and emotional processing.
2013) implemented supportive, nondirective interventions and were associated with more disparate treatment effects than studies of cognitive or exposure therapies.
Kottman (2001) highlighted that the majority of counselors using play therapy operate from a nondirective, children-centered approach.
Current literature generally supports the finding that passive, nondirective, emotion-focused, self-blaming, and avoidance coping strategies are likely to be associated with problems in psychosocial adaptation among people with a disability (Smedema et al.
89) While nondirective supervision is the preferred method of supervision, (90) directive supervision has its place.
This nondirective approach requires clients to understand and agree with the philosophy behind WC practices and to participate fully in the writing process in order to produce texts that are fully their own.
During interviews, nondirective questions were asked from a variety of perspectives to ensure flexibility in probing.
Helping abused and traumatized children: Integrating directive and nondirective approaches.
In the first category, they cite the "biophilia hypothesis," * learning theory, and social mediation theories, attachment theory, object relations theory, social provisions theory, and nondirective or Rogerian theory.
Lipsey (1999) would later show the ineffectiveness of such programs in his meta analysis of nondirective intervention.