noncombatant


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noncombatant

(non″kom′bă-tănt, non″kŏm-bat′ănt)
1. A member of the military who does not engage in combat, such as a chaplain or physician.
2. A civilian, esp. in a combat zone.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Forces Korea (USFK) service members and families are prepared to evacuate designated noncombatants in case of a conflict on the peninsula.
Possible answers include: (1) nonlethal weapons cause no harm; (2) the harm that nonlethal weapons cause is insufficient to violate noncombatant immunity; and (3) some civilians are liable to direct harm..
Considering noncombatant immunity in Gaza and Kosovo, Fisher concludes that Israel breached the principle of noncombatant immunity in Gaza, while NATO did not in Kosovo (pp.
Gross later claims that "all nonlethal weapons intentionally target un-uniformed combatants and noncombatants alike, a blatant violation of humanitarian law." But that statement is misleading in that it equivocates on "targeting" and "weapons" in ways that obscure moral and legal restrictions on lethal weapons.
The report, which is the fourth in a series, also found that about 10% of soldiers and Marines deployed in Iraq reported mistreating Iraqi noncombatants at one time or another.
Many military operations, such as peacekeeping missions or noncombatant evacuations, may restrict the use of deadly weapons.
Hence in A Red Death Easy recalls his voluntary combat duty with General Patton's forces at a time when blacks in nonsegregated units were officially restricted to noncombatant status.
The support activities will remain unchanged, limited to noncombatant operations mainly involving supplying fuel and goods by Maritime Self-Defense Force vessels to U.S.
This oversight has the result in C.'s view that the legitimate authority, accruing to the righteous revolutionary, erodes respect for preserving noncombatant immunity.
Nothing more is known of him than that he was probably a native of Evreux and was a noncombatant making the pilgrimage to Jerusalem.
To put non-combatants at increased risk is to treat them as objects of war, which ultimately erodes noncombatant immunity.
One final perspective offered by the Lebanon adventure of 2006: A civilized society that wishes to live up to that designation must restore basic respect for the just-war principle of noncombatant immunity and make public commitments to the same.