non-gender-specific

non-gender-specific

adjective Referring or pertaining to something which does not have features of either traditional gender role, or which has features of both.
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In fact, male-specific cancers kill far fewer men than non-gender-specific cancers such as lung, bowel and colorectal cancers.
Research into Maryland building code confirmed an impediment to providing more non-gender-specific accommodations: current model plumbing codes, including those adopted by the State of Maryland and Montgomery County, require that most restroom fixtures in the types of buildings typically found at the college--academic buildings, administrative buildings, student services buildings, and athletic or recreational facilities--be designated male or female.
Mitchell brings a different nuance to the commonly recognized disjunction between their fiction as more ideologically feminist and their journalism that is perceived as more conservative by convincingly demonstrating in the second chapter, "Journalism, Essays, Conduct Books," that such disjunction is only present in articles and non-fictional works that address a non-gender-specific readership.
Top of my list is "waitron", which is their non-gender-specific designation for waiters and waitresses, followed by "robot" for traffic lights.
We wanted to specifically examine football players' comfort level by same and opposite sex athletic trainers for gender and non-gender-specific injuries - while seeing if gender stereotypes influenced opinions," said Dr.
While we feel that Moscow Mule will appeal particularly to women, this product is not meant to exclude men either, as we have demonstrated in its non-gender-specific bottle design," said Halewood's head of innovation, Richard Clark.
Wrestling Constructed as a Non-Gender-Specific Sport.
This non-gender-specific, or gender-neutral, look is how homes have to look.
Then there is the non-gender-specific charity present - a goat for Africa or a cow for India - but, again, this doesn't seem very Bush.
The chapter on the "Woman Question" is too brief, although it recognizes, in Connolly's use of non-gender-specific language, his progressive nature and strong feminist instincts.
The way I look at the bridegroom/ bride analogy, if God is male, as they continue to profess by not allowing the use of non-gender-specific language, it seems to me that all of the priests should be female, does it not?
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