nomograph


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

nom·o·graph

(nom'ō-graf),
1. A graph consisting of three coplanar curves, usually parallel, each graduated for a different variable so that a straight line cutting all three curves intersects the related values of each variable.
2. Synonym(s): nomogram
[G. nomos, law, + graphō, to write]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The nomograph as shown in Table I supports more aggressive and higher designated amounts if FSA advantages are to be maximized by plan participants.
Very interesting nomographs, which may be used to calculate weld impact strength from said parameters, are presented for use by practitioners.
One other point about spreading loss: The loss value derived from the nomograph and from the above formula is for the spreading loss between two isotropic antennas (that is, antennas with "unity" or 0-dB gain).
To determine whether highway agencies are employing the ball-bank indicator or the TCDH nomograph in setting the safe curve speeds, the actual recommended speed at each site was compared to the speeds derived via these methods.
The nomograph based soil erodibility estimations have proved to give accurate results (DSI, 2000).
2003) included the effect of hydrophobicity in the K factor, and assumed that a hydrophobic soil would have the lowest hydraulic conductivity accepted in the USLE soil nomograph.
While not considered a design tool in the sense of a nomograph, such plots are useful indicators of the ranges that are achievable for various cable products.
For other soils, where a different subset of soil properties controlled particle size distributions after rainfall wetting, the original nomograph was found to perform poorly.
Usually the Soil Erodibiity Factor (K) factor can be attained from local Natural Resources Conservation Service offices, but the unique, inverted soil profile of the military earthworks caused us to determine K values from the standard nomograph provided by Dissmeyer and Foster (1984).
For example, the soil erodibility nomograph for the USLE does not seem to apply to many strongly structured soils found in the tropics (El-Swaify and Dangler 1976), although Loch and Rosewell (1992) showed that estimates of the erodibility parameter can be improved if wet sediment density and water-stable aggregate sizes were used instead of the density and sizes of primary particles as originally recommended (Wischmeier et al.
The author describes how water tank dimensions can affect water supply in storage and presents the use of a nomograph for calculating storage volume from circular tank dimensions.
When this happens a very helpful nomograph is given below.