nomenclature

(redirected from nomenclatures)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.

nomenclature

 [no´men-kla″chur]
terminology; a classified system of technical names, such as of anatomical structures or organisms.
binomial nomenclature the nomenclature used in scientific classification of living organisms in which each organism is designated by two latinized names (genus and species), both of which must always be used because species names are not necessarily unique. note: The genus name is always capitalized, the species name is not, and both are italicized, e.g., Escherichia coli. When a name is repeated the genus name may be abbreviated by its initial, e.g., E. coli.

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'men-klā'chūr, nō-men'klă-chūr),
A system of names, as of anatomic structures, molecular entities, or organisms, used in any science.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature

/no·men·cla·ture/ (no´men-kla″cher) a classified system of names, as of anatomical structures, organisms, etc.
binomial nomenclature  the system of designating plants and animals by two latinized words signifying the genus and species.

nomenclature

(nō′mən-klā′chər, nō-mĕn′klə-)
n.
1. A system of names used in an art or science: the nomenclature of mineralogy.
2. The system or procedure of assigning names to groups of organisms as part of a taxonomic classification: the rules of nomenclature in botany.

no′men·cla′tur·al adj.

nomenclature

[nō′mənklā′chər, nōmen′-]
Etymology: L, nomen, name, clamare, to call
a consistent, systematic method of naming used in a scientific discipline to denote classifications and avoid ambiguities in names, such as binomial nomenclature in biology and chemical nomenclature in chemistry.

nomenclature

Any naming convention based on principles delineated and accepted by an official committee or body—e.g., the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC), the Enzyme Commission of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB), etc.
 
Alternative medicine
The names used in alternative healthcare often overlap with those of mainstream medicine, as well as other fields, and may cause confusion to the practitioners of both types of medicine, as well as to patients. For example, colonic irrigation is used by mainstream practitioners for the flushing of the large intestine in preparation for emergency surgery, and used by alternative practitioners as a synonym for colon therapy, the practice of performing multiple enemas to flush out putative toxins.

Science-speak
Any system for assigning names to a particular structure.

nomenclature

Any system for assigning names to a particular structure. See Binomial nomenclature, Classification, SNOMED, SNOP, Taxonomy Alternative medicine The names used in alternative health care often overlap with those of mainstream medicine and other fields and may confuse practitioners of both types of medicine, as well as Pts.
Nomenclature–alternative medical term–sources of confusion
Different uses for same term Eg, colonic irrigation is used in mainstream medicine for flushing the colon in preparation for emergency surgery, and in alternative health as a synonym for colon therapy, the practice of performing multiple enemas to flush out putative toxins; similarly, herbologists use the same names for medicinal plants as used by horticulturists, which may or may not refer to the same plants; Example: geranium for ornamental use and for medicinal use
Different terms for the same entity Eg, homeopaths use a latinized term, Natrum muriaticum, for table salt–sodium chloride; similarly, some herbs are known by the trivial name, eg, rue, and blood root, while the homeopathic remedies based on these same plants take the Latin name, Ruta, and Sanguinaria, respectively

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'mĕn-klā-chŭr)
A set system of names used in any science, as of anatomic structures, organisms, and other classifications.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature

A system of names used in a science or other discipline.

nomenclature

see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE.

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'mĕn-klā-chŭr)
A set system of names used in any science, as of anatomic structures, organisms, and other classifications.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature (nō´menklā´chur),

n the formally adopted terminology of a science, art, or discipline; the system of names or terms used in a particular branch of science.
nomenclature, anatomic,
n a naming system used to identify and classify the structures and organs of the body.

nomenclature

terminology; a classified system of technical names, as of anatomical structures, organisms, etc.

binomial nomenclature
the system of designating plants and animals by two latinized words signifying the genus and species.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Army nomenclature refers to the vehicle in our example as a "Trk, Util M998A.
You then can use the FSC as a FED LOG search criterion to determine the appropriate item name, nomenclature, and national item identification number (NIIN).
Logisticians who master the H2, H6, and FED LOG databases will be able to find the appropriate NSN, LIN, item name, and nomenclature for the items they need.
MIAME/Tox includes some free-text fields along with controlled vocabularies or external ontologies, specifically regarding species taxonomy, cell types, anatomy terms, histopathology, clinical chemistry, toxicology, and chemical compound nomenclature.
systemized nomenclature of medicine (SNOMED); http://www.
org/), including common minimal descriptors, standard data storage and exchange format, and harmonized nomenclature.
lay down, in their statistical nomenclatures, provisions in respect of the certification of hand-made products as such, if they deem it necessary;
insert in their statistical nomenclatures, as soon as possible, as many additional subdivisions for hand-made products as they deem necessary; and
the list of subdivisions in their statistical nomenclatures for hand-made products; and
Furthermore, the different ANA-recognized nomenclatures represent different components of the nursing process.
For example, clinical pathways based on medical diagnoses should also contain nursing diagnoses, interventions, and outcome measures based on ANA-recognized nomenclatures.
These fragmented services usually do not offer their organizations a standardized nomenclature for defining the findings and experiences of patients, or of risk-adjusting for the prior probabilities of patients' outcomes, or a standardized way of presenting data analysis to clinicians and managers.