nomenclature


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nomenclature

 [no´men-kla″chur]
terminology; a classified system of technical names, such as of anatomical structures or organisms.
binomial nomenclature the nomenclature used in scientific classification of living organisms in which each organism is designated by two latinized names (genus and species), both of which must always be used because species names are not necessarily unique. note: The genus name is always capitalized, the species name is not, and both are italicized, e.g., Escherichia coli. When a name is repeated the genus name may be abbreviated by its initial, e.g., E. coli.

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'men-klā'chūr, nō-men'klă-chūr),
A system of names, as of anatomic structures, molecular entities, or organisms, used in any science.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature

/no·men·cla·ture/ (no´men-kla″cher) a classified system of names, as of anatomical structures, organisms, etc.
binomial nomenclature  the system of designating plants and animals by two latinized words signifying the genus and species.

nomenclature

(nō′mən-klā′chər, nō-mĕn′klə-)
n.
1. A system of names used in an art or science: the nomenclature of mineralogy.
2. The system or procedure of assigning names to groups of organisms as part of a taxonomic classification: the rules of nomenclature in botany.

no′men·cla′tur·al adj.

nomenclature

[nō′mənklā′chər, nōmen′-]
Etymology: L, nomen, name, clamare, to call
a consistent, systematic method of naming used in a scientific discipline to denote classifications and avoid ambiguities in names, such as binomial nomenclature in biology and chemical nomenclature in chemistry.

nomenclature

Any naming convention based on principles delineated and accepted by an official committee or body—e.g., the HUGO Gene Nomenclature Committee (HGNC), the Enzyme Commission of the International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (IUBMB), etc.
 
Alternative medicine
The names used in alternative healthcare often overlap with those of mainstream medicine, as well as other fields, and may cause confusion to the practitioners of both types of medicine, as well as to patients. For example, colonic irrigation is used by mainstream practitioners for the flushing of the large intestine in preparation for emergency surgery, and used by alternative practitioners as a synonym for colon therapy, the practice of performing multiple enemas to flush out putative toxins.

Science-speak
Any system for assigning names to a particular structure.

nomenclature

Any system for assigning names to a particular structure. See Binomial nomenclature, Classification, SNOMED, SNOP, Taxonomy Alternative medicine The names used in alternative health care often overlap with those of mainstream medicine and other fields and may confuse practitioners of both types of medicine, as well as Pts.
Nomenclature–alternative medical term–sources of confusion
Different uses for same term Eg, colonic irrigation is used in mainstream medicine for flushing the colon in preparation for emergency surgery, and in alternative health as a synonym for colon therapy, the practice of performing multiple enemas to flush out putative toxins; similarly, herbologists use the same names for medicinal plants as used by horticulturists, which may or may not refer to the same plants; Example: geranium for ornamental use and for medicinal use
Different terms for the same entity Eg, homeopaths use a latinized term, Natrum muriaticum, for table salt–sodium chloride; similarly, some herbs are known by the trivial name, eg, rue, and blood root, while the homeopathic remedies based on these same plants take the Latin name, Ruta, and Sanguinaria, respectively

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'mĕn-klā-chŭr)
A set system of names used in any science, as of anatomic structures, organisms, and other classifications.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature

A system of names used in a science or other discipline.

nomenclature

see BINOMIAL NOMENCLATURE.

no·men·cla·ture

(nō'mĕn-klā-chŭr)
A set system of names used in any science, as of anatomic structures, organisms, and other classifications.
[L. nomenclatura, a listing of names, fr. nomen, name, + calo, to proclaim]

nomenclature (nō´menklā´chur),

n the formally adopted terminology of a science, art, or discipline; the system of names or terms used in a particular branch of science.
nomenclature, anatomic,
n a naming system used to identify and classify the structures and organs of the body.

nomenclature

terminology; a classified system of technical names, as of anatomical structures, organisms, etc.

binomial nomenclature
the system of designating plants and animals by two latinized words signifying the genus and species.
References in classic literature ?
All dim and vague it was, a sensation, an emotion, a feeling, an instinct, an intuition, name it mistily as one will in the misty nomenclature of speech wherein words cheat with the impression of definiteness and lie to the brain an understanding which the brain does not possess.
It was true, she refined it to "position," but it meant the same thing, and in his own mind the old nomenclature stuck.
In the nomenclature which we derive from fabulists, des Lupeaulx belonged to the species Bertrand, and was always in search of Ratons.
4] So named according to Patrick Symes's nomenclature.
He often speaks of himself in the third person; perhaps, being a little misty as to his own identity, when he narrates; perhaps impartially adopting the Cloisterham nomenclature in reference to a character of acknowledged distinction.
The alliteration is good, and there is something in the nomenclature that gives to us as a body the sense of corporate existence: Apprentice, Mate, Master, in the ancient and hon ourable craft of the sea.
The semi-barbarous hunters from the Canadas, the same description of population, a little more enlightened, from the States, and the metiffs or half-breeds, who claimed to be ranked in the class of white men, were scattered among the different Indian tribes, or gleaned a scanty livelihood in solitude, amid the haunts of the beaver and the bison; or, to adopt the popular nomenclature of the country of the buffaloe.
Historically, our vehicle nomenclature system has been iconic in itself, with the names of many of our model series at least as well known as the MercedesA[degrees] Benz brand name," said Dirk Fetzer, director of sales and marA[degrees] keting at Daimler Middle East and Levant.
The old nomenclature neither reflects current scientific knowledge nor provides clinicians with pharmacologic information useful in making informed treatment decisions.
Written for human cytogeneticists, technicians, and students, this volume updates, revises, and incorporates all previous ISCN (International System for Human Cytogenic Nomenclature) human cytogenic nomenclature recommendations into one publication.
The research, completed in conjunction with Midan Marketing, a Chicago-based agency focused in the meat channel, uncovered a disconnect between the current Uniform Retail Meat Identification Standards (URMIS) nomenclature and consumers knowledge of the cuts and their uses.
Their Royal Highness also emphasized that it is now high time to adopt a patriotic nomenclature that represents the united people of Bahrain and combat divisionism and that nationalism and not sectarianism should be the hub around which everybody congregate under the umbrella of the motherland, citing that everybody has a duty towards the motherland and that is to stop any political nomenclature that divides and does not unite, remarking that Bahrain needs a responsible political nomenclature which should be responsible and not provocative, uniting and not disuniting.

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