nomadism


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nomadism

(nō′măd-ĭzm) [Gr. nomas, roaming about]
Having a constantly migratory lifestyle, as is practiced by some animals and humans.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Nomadism is therefore also a gesture of non-confidence in the capacity of theoretical language to undo the power foundations on which it rests.
Not "I think, therefore I am," which is "the obsession of the West, its downfall, its folly," but rather, or so it seems from what Braidotti writes: "I want; therefore it is the case." Feminist nomadism, in other words, embodies a rather touching, not to say childlike, "belief in the potency and relevance of the imagination, of myth-making, as a way to step out of the political and intellectual stasis."
'I was at the residence of Pa Fasoranti when the Governors of the South West told him their position against nomadism in the South West.
Neither famine nor nomadism is an easy subject to research.
theoretical reflections on diaspora, nomadism, and exile by researchers
It's been called a variety of names: digital nomadism, online entrepreneurship, digital marketing, among others,' Carson pointed out.
That's not nomadism, they are people who settled here and want to have a normal life like anyone else."
From one extreme to the other, flamenco appeared in each case as a model of resistant and resilient living, capable of rejecting work, engaging in nomadism, and pursuing celebration--thus producing a heterodox form of habitability.
The event will focus on 'Emirati Landscape: Flora, Fauna and Soil.' The journey will then move to the London Design Festival in September for the second exhibition entitled 'Nomadism: Yesterday & Now' where the same ten designers will display uniquely commissioned pieces.