nodular melanoma


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nod·u·lar mel·a·no·ma

primary cutaneous melanoma that presents as rapidly growing smoothly spheroid or ulcerated nodules in which tumor cells microscopically invade the dermis beneath all the lateral epidermal margins of involvement.

nodular melanoma

The most aggressive of all melanomas, which arises de novo in the so-called vertical growth phase—i.e., it is invasive ab initio. Nodular melanomas comprise 15% of all melanomas.

Prognosis
50% average 5-year survival.

nodular melanoma

A melanoma that comprises 15% of melanomas; NM is similar clinically to superficial spreading melanoma; 50% average 5-yr survival. See Melanoma.
References in periodicals archive ?
(3-8,16) Historically, three main subtypes of melanoma including superficial spreading melanoma (SSM), lentigo maligna melanoma (LMM) and nodular melanoma (NM) were first described in 1969; (9) desmoplastic melanoma (DM) was added in 1971; (12) and acral lentiginous melanoma (ALM) was introduced in 197710 and defined in 1980.
The findings raise the possibility that these lesions are recognizable precursors of nodular melanoma, he said.
(465,466) Other studies (453,455,462,464,471) have suggested that NRAS mutations are more frequently seen in nodular melanomas. In addition, there is a correlation between increased tumor thickness and NRAS mutation, which mirrors the higher percentage of NRAS mutations in nodular melanoma.
The most common scenarios in melanoma litigation cases include nodular melanoma being misdiagnosed by a clinician or pathologist; a partial biopsy not capturing the most diagnostically relevant part of the lesion; malignant melanoma being misdiagnosed as a dysplastic or spitz nevus; unrecognized desmoplastic malignant melanoma; and metastatic malignant melanoma with an unknown primary or recurrence of melanoma (Am.
The most common scenarios in melanoma litigation cases include nodular melanoma being misdiagnosed by a clinician or pathologist, a partial biopsy not capturing the most diagnostically relevant part of the lesion, malignant melanoma being misdiagnosed as a dysplastic or spitz nevus, unrecognized desmoplastic malignant melanoma, and metastatic malignant melanoma with an unknown primary or recurrence of melanoma (Am.
But these criteria do not apply to nodular melanomas, which typically are round, elevated, red or pink, and uniform in color throughout.
Initially, 3 experts interpreted the lesion as a nodular melanoma, while 1 considered it a DPN.
Superficial spreading and nodular melanoma are the most common types in children.
Marghoob does not recommend following lesions in which the differential diagnosis includes nodular melanoma. The article should have stated that "lesions should be biopsied when the differential diagnosis, no matter how remote, includes nodular melanoma.
In superficial spreading or nodular melanoma, epithelioid cells show severe degree of epithelioid cell atypia.
* Nodular melanoma misdiagnosed as a nevus by the pathologist.
When the VGP appears de novo without preexisting RGP, it manifests as nodular melanoma. Histologically, the VGP that supervenes on RGP appears as a new cell population with metastatic capability that determines the clinical course.

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