fasciitis

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fasciitis

 [fas″e-i´tis]
inflammation of a fascia.
necrotizing fasciitis a fulminating group A streptococcal infection beginning with severe or extensive cellulitis that spreads to involve the superficial and deep fascia, producing thrombosis of the subcutaneous vessels and gangrene of the underlying tissues. A cutaneous lesion usually serves as a portal of entry for the infection, but sometimes no such lesion is found.
nodular fasciitis (proliferative fasciitis) a benign, reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in the subcutaneous tissues and commonly associated with the deep fascia.
pseudosarcomatous fasciitis a benign soft tissue tumor occurring subcutaneously and sometimes arising from deep muscle and fascia.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

fas·ci·i·tis

(fas'ē-ī'tis, fash-),
1. Inflammation in fascia.
2. Reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in fascia.
Synonym(s): fascitis
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

fasciitis

(făsh′ē-ī′tĭs, făs′-)
n.
Inflammation in a fascia, usually as a result of infection or injury.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

fasciitis

Orthopedics Inflammation of a fascia. See Eosinophilic faciitis, Necrotizing fasciitis, Nodular fasciitis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fas·ci·i·tis

(fashē-ītis)
1. Inflammation of the fascia.
2. Reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in fascia.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

fasciitis

Inflammation of FASCIA. Fasciitis is rare and is sometimes associated with conditions such as ANKYLOSING SPONDYLITIS or REACTIVE ARTHRITIS. See also NECROTIZING FASCIITIS.
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005

fas·ci·i·tis

(fashē-ītis)
1. Inflammation in fascia.
2. Reactive proliferation of fibroblasts in fascia.
Medical Dictionary for the Dental Professions © Farlex 2012

Patient discussion about fasciitis

Q. Can anyone suggest a treatment for plantar fasciitis, apart from ultrasound, physio, anti-inflammatory agents? My friend has had Plantar Fasciitis for more than 1 year and has persevered with all the ususal treatments above plus lots of rest from weight-bearing and elevation.

A. Padded foot splints, silicone heels insert and special shoes (e.g. arch-supporting shoes) may also help. These are usually sold and fitted by a professional. Exercise is another important measure. Some patients benefit from avoiding walking barefoot or in sleepers but rather using shoes from the first step.

More advanced treatments include steroid-local anesthetics injections, botulinum toxin (similar to botox) injections and surgery.

The prognosis is usually favorable, and most patients achieve relief of the pain.

However, all of the above is just for general knowledge - if you have any specific question, you may want to consult a doctor.

You may read more here:
www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/007021.htm

Q. Is there any good source for heel pain relief, besides NSAIDs? My heel pain is most severe at night when I sleep. It's as if the way I position my feet worsen the condition, but I'm at a loss to know how to position my feet. During the day my heels feel so but don't typically bother me.

A. I have found that keeping my feet flexed (the position they are in when standing) helps ease the pain of plantar facitis. I also don't let my feet get cold(wear socks)and keep heavy blankets and quilts off the feet. Placing a box under the covers at the foot of the bed will help keep the blankets up. Do try the exercises recommended on the above web sites. It usually resolves in about 6 months. Best wishes!

More discussions about fasciitis
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