nocturnal hypoglycemia


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nocturnal hypoglycemia

A low blood glucose level (< 50 mg/dl or 3.3 mmol/L) that occurs after bedtime. It may be asymptomatic, or it may cause nightmares, night sweats, other sleep disturbances, tachycardia, convulsions, or, rarely, death. It typically results from relatively high levels of insulin in insulin-treated diabetic patients. It may be prevented by consuming a bedtime snack or by adjusting evening doses of insulin based on bedtime blood glucose levels.
See also: hypoglycemia
References in periodicals archive ?
In 2 recently completed 64-week crossover trials, severe or confirmed symptomatic overall and severe or confirmed symptomatic nocturnal hypoglycemia occurred in fewer patients with T1DM or T2DM treated with IDeg vs IGlar U-100.
In contrast, patients with moderate-capacity, low-affinity IAs may suffer from moderate nocturnal hypoglycemia.
Nocturnal hypoglycemia occurs when blood glucose levels fall below the target physiological level (4 mmol/l or 72 mg/dl) at night time.
Less nocturnal hypoglycemia and better post-dinner glucose control with bedtime insulin glargine compared with bedtime NPH insulin during insulin combination therapy in type 2 diabetes.
He worried less about nocturnal hypoglycemia when he started dialysis over five years ago because he was married to a nurse.
In an effort to detect nocturnal hypoglycemia, parents of young children may develop more intensive monitoring techniques for overnight hours, including scheduled monitoring of nocturnal BG levels or using less independent sleeping arrangements (Sullivan-Bolyai et al.
Going to bed with a blood glucose level greater than 130 mg/dL after a day without afternoon exercise protected patients against nocturnal hypoglycemia.
Less nocturnal hypoglycemia and better post dinner glucose control with bedtime insulin glargine compared with bedtime NPH insulin during insulin combination therapy in Type 2 diabetes.
Rates of confirmed and nocturnal hypoglycemia were similar in both groups.
He noted that those on the closed-loop system did not have to announce meals to the control algorithm, or give any meal-time insulin--"we didn't want to trouble our nurses with this, due to the increasing workload that health care professionals in the hospital currently face," he said--and showed "significantly improved" nighttime control of glucose while "simultaneously reducing the risk of nocturnal hypoglycemia.

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