nocturnal dyspnea

noc·tur·nal dysp·ne·a

dyspnea occurring at night, several hours after assuming recumbent position. Occurs in heart failure and results from reabsorption of water from dependent areas after removal of effect of gravity, causing hypervolemia, and aggravating left-ventricular failure.

nocturnal dyspnea

Sleep disorders Respiratory distress, minimal during the day, which is disturbing in sleep
References in periodicals archive ?
Common manifestation of PPCM includes shortness of breath, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, cough, haemoptysis and chest pain.3
He woke up in the middle of the night, feeling like he was drowning (paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea).
When heart failure patients awaken in the night short of breath, they are said to have paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea.
A 20-year-old female previously healthy presented with symptoms of reduced effort tolerance and chest discomfort for four months without orthopnea or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. The electrocardiogram and blood investigations were within normal limits.
Some of the signs and symptoms, such as dyspnea, orthopnea, and paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, are due to congestion, while some are due to lack of adequate cardiac output, including fatigue, weakness, and exercise intolerance.
Congestive heart failure can present with acutely worsening dyspnea and cough, but is also commonly associated with orthopnea and/or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea. On physical examination, findings of volume overload such as pulmonary crackles, lower extremity edema, and elevated jugular venous pressure are additional signs that heart failure is present.
On admission, he developed increased nocturnal dyspnea, leg edema, and nausea.
A 14-month-old male presented with 3 months of worsening paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, with multiple sleep interruptions consisting of episodic respiratory distress, cyanosis, and coughing.
He denied any history of fever, cough, shortness of breath, abdominal pain, paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, and weight loss.
Moreover, the patient had no paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea and orthopnea.
Other exclusion criteria were as follows: heart dysfunction (symptoms of dyspnea, orthopnea, or paroxysmal nocturnal dyspnea, accompanied by a left ventricular ejection fraction <40%); hypersensitivity to CM or BNP; end-stage renal failure; systolic blood pressure [less than or equal to] 100 mmHg before study drug infusion; CM administered within the past 7 days; BNP infusion within 1 month; administration of dopamine, N-acetyl-cysteine, sodium bicarbonate, and fenoldopam during the study.