noctiluca


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

noctiluca

(nŏk′tə-lo͞o′kə)
n.
Any of various bioluminescent dinoflagellates of the genus Noctiluca that when grouped in large numbers make the sea phosphorescent.
References in periodicals archive ?
8 adet kucuk ve agiz cevresinde yer alan 4 adet buyuk tentakul ile hos bir goruntu olusturan Pelagia noctiluca, aslinda zehirli ve tehlikeli bir denizanasidir (Russell, 1970).
Notons toutefois que pour les especes qu'on trouve au niveau des cotes de la region de Tetouan en particulier la Pelagia noctiluca, l'application de vinaigre sur la piqure de meduse peut s'averer benefique.
The researchers show how the millions of green algae living within the cells of Noctiluca allow it to exploit an oxygen-starved dead zone the size of Texas.
Zur Raumnutzung von Larven, Weibchen und Mannchen des grossen Gluhwurmchens Lampyris noctiluca. Mitt.
Millions of green algae living in the thick blooms of the Noctiluca scintillans have allowed it to exploit an oxygen-starved zone the size of Texas.
The researchers used satellites and ships to observe the phytoplankton called Noctiluca scintillans that have emerged on vast swathes of the sea west of Gujarat and northern Maharashtra and south of Pakistan during the winter months year after year over the past decade.
The particular species common in south east Australia is called noctiluca. They also cause the red tide phenomena which is common off the Sydney beaches, " Sydney Institute of Marine Sciences' Dr Luke Hedge (http://www.dailytelegraph.com.au/newslocal/northern-beaches/bioluminescent-creatures-light-up-manlys-waves-and-attract-photographers/story-fngr8hax-1227036007841) said .
In the Sea of Oman, over 70% of coastal algal blooms are reportedly caused by the dinoflagellate, Noctiluca scintillans, which is a species actively avoided by the Indian oil sardine.
The highest fraction of 26% of the whole phytoplankton population was that of the Chaetoceros sp., and the highest fraction of dinoflagellate was that of the Noctiluca sp.
Summary: The Noctiluca algae can cause rashes on human skin and is noxious.
Scientists say high water temperatures and lack of rain have attracted unusually large numbers of Pelagia noctiluca, commonly known as the mauve stinger.