noble

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No·ble

(nō'bĕl),
Charles P., U.S. gynecologist, 1863-1935. See: Noble position.

No·ble

(nō'bĕl),
Robert L., 20th-century Canadian physiologist. See: Noble-Collip procedure.

noble,

adj an archaic term referring to inert gases and precious metals.
noble metal,
Nocardia,
n a genus of aerobic nonmotile actinomycetes, which are transitional between bacteria and fungi. They are primarily saprophytic but may cause disease in man and other animals.
References in classic literature ?
All the nobility, and all the patriarchs and prophets - every last one of them - and all the archangels, and all the princes and governors and viceroys, were there, - and NO small fry - not a single one.
But I was soon informed, both by conversation and reading their histories; for, in the course of many ages, they have been troubled with the same disease to which the whole race of mankind is subject; the nobility often contending for power, the people for liberty, and the king for absolute dominion.
The establishment of the writ of habeas corpus, the prohibition of ex post facto laws, and of TITLES OF NOBILITY, to which we have no corresponding provision in our Constitution, are perhaps greater securities to liberty and republicanism than any it contains.
The prohibition with respect to titles of nobility is copied from the articles of Confederation and needs no comment.
Monsieur de Sponde, the maternal grandfather of Mademoiselle Cormon, was elected by the Nobility to the States-General, and Monsieur Cormon, her father, by the Tiers-Etat, though neither accepted the mission.
It is a Law of Nature with us that a male child shall have one more side than his father, so that each generation shall rise(as a rule) one step in the scale of development and nobility.
And that prince who, relying entirely on their promises, has neglected other precautions, is ruined; because friendships that are obtained by payments, and not by greatness or nobility of mind, may indeed be earned, but they are not secured, and in time of need cannot be relied upon; and men have less scruple in offending one who is beloved than one who is feared, for love is preserved by the link of obligation which, owing to the baseness of men, is broken at every opportunity for their advantage; but fear preserves you by a dread of punishment which never fails.
You are a man of honour, nobility of character, and self-respect, as everyone knows; yet, at any moment, you are ready to die with shame
Anne had never at the Louvre had so large a court; but this crowd represented chiefly the second class of nobility, while the Prince de Conti, the Duc de Beaufort and the coadjutor assembled around them the first nobility of France.
Like most of the high nobility, who rightly enough believed that primogeniture and birth were of the last importance to THEM, she preferred to show her distaste for the present order of things, by which the youngest prince of a numerous family had been put upon the throne of the oldest, by remaining at her chateau.
I wish you to be distinguished by the splendor which glory and fortune confer, for nobility of descent you have already.
In England, for example, no mere parade of costly appurtenances would be so likely as with us, to create an impression of the beautiful in respect to the appurtenances themselves - or of taste as regards the proprietor: - this for the reason, first, that wealth is not, in England, the loftiest object of ambition as constituting a nobility; and secondly, that there, the true nobility of blood, confining itself within the strict limits of legitimate taste, rather avoids than affects that mere costliness in which a parvenu rivalry may at any time be successfully attempted.