no-reflow phenomenon


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Related to no-reflow phenomenon: Reperfusion injury

no-reflow phenomenon

 [no re´flo]
when cerebral blood flow is restored following prolonged global cerebral ischemia, there is initial hyperemia followed by a gradual decline in perfusion until there is almost no blood flow.

no-reflow phenomenon

Cardiology The finding that restoration of antegrade flow in an occluded epicardial artery in acute MI may not result in recovery of microvascular tissue perfusion; Pts with NRP have lower
1-month ejection fractions, larger end-diastolic volumes, and more persistent heart failure; Pts at high risk with significant zones of no reflow after thrombolytics might need emergency coronary angiography, and benefit from early and aggressive ACE inhibition to prevent LV remodeling. See Ventricular remodeling.

no-reflow phenomenon

a failure of reperfusion to occur after adequate fluid therapy for shock due to microvascular injury.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In this study, we combined hs-CRP with ET-1 to detect their dynamic changes before and after PCI and the correlation, aiming to provide a scientific basis for the no-reflow phenomenon after PCI.
12 No-reflow phenomenon is commonly seen in the myocardium, but can also be found in the brain, kidneys, skeletal muscles, etc.
In conclusion, hsCRP and ET-1 levels significantly increased in patients with no-reflow phenomenon.
Relation of therothrombosis burden and volume detected by intravascular ultrasound to angiographic no-reflow phenomenon during stent implantation in patients with acute myocardial infarction.
The purpose of our study was to investigate the effect of serotonin levels on no-reflow phenomenon following a primary PCI in patients with acute ST-elevation myocardial infarction.
Angiographically, no-reflow phenomenon was defined as a flow of TIMI 2 or less without the presence of dissection, mechanical obstruction, significant residual stenosis or other plausible causes (2, 3).
There was no significant relationship between the vessel responsible for myocardial infarction and no-reflow phenomenon (p=0.
No-reflow phenomenon was angiographically defined as a flow of TIMI 2 or less without the presence of dissection, mechanical obstruction, significant residual stenosis or other plausible causes (5,6).
Furthermore, more sensitive imaging modalities as magnetic resonance imaging are emerging as potent instrument for the diagnosis and the follow-up of no-reflow phenomenon (19).