nitrous acid


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ni·trous ac·id

(nī'trŭs as'id),
HNO2; a standard biologic and clinical laboratory reagent.

ni·trous ac·id

(nī'trŭs as'id)
A standard biologic and clinical laboratory reagent.

ni·trous ac·id

(HNO2) (nī'trŭs as'id)
A standard biologic and clinical laboratory reagent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Mechanistic explanation has been reported for the reaction of nitrous acid and nitrosonium ion N[O.sup.+] with oximes by Kliegman and Barnes [6].
The formation of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO): a key determinant of tropospheric ozone and fine particles, Final Report for Contract No.
It has been known for some twenty years that the decomposition of nitrous acid in light frees up hydroxyl radicals that spark the ozone production cycle.
Stirring of reaction mixture was continued for 1h more maintaining the same temperature, with a positive test for nitrous acid on iodo paper.
Ng, "The role of nitrite and free nitrous acid (FNA) in wastewater treatment plants," Water Research, vol.
During such episodes, she adds, there seems to be an ongoing supply of nitrous acid to maintain OH levels, which raises the question of where that supply is stored.
The induced mutagenesis involving radiations (like ultraviolet or gamma rays) or chemicals (like alkylating agents or nitrous acid) has been attempted to increase the metabolic performance of bacterial strains for better amylase production (Daba et al.
Further, although nitrous acid levels typically reach 5-15 ppb by volume indoors and 30 ppb by volume in vehicles, concentrations as high as 100 ppb by volume have been measured indoors.
Hugo Destaillats and colleagues from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (California, USA) discovered that nicotine reacts with a common indoor air pollutant found in smokers' homes and cars, called nitrous acid (HONO), to form carcinogenic compounds known as tobacco-specific nitrosamines (TSNAs).
At the same humidity, [NO.sub.2] can also react directly with surfaces to form the weaker -- though still salt-producing -- nitrous acid.
Hydralazine has been determined by GC after derivatization with nitrous acid [18] or with acetyl acetone [19, 20] using packed column.
One of Murphy's discoveries, published this past December in Nature Geoscience, is that nitrous acid, a primary contributor to smog, cannot survive exposure to sunlight but is continually refreshed by spending its nights hiding in soil.