nitrogenous base


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Related to nitrogenous base: nucleic acid, DNA, amino acid, DNA structure

base

 [bās]
1. the lowest part or foundation of anything. See also basis.
2. the main ingredient of a compound.
3. the nonacid part of a salt; a substance that combines with acids to form salts. In the chemical processes of the body, bases are essential to the maintenance of a normal acid-base balance. Excessive concentration of bases in the body fluids leads to alkalosis.
4. a unit of a removable dental prosthesis.
5. in genetics, a nucleotide, particularly one in a nucleic acid sequence.
intermediary base the layer of cement between a dental restoration and the tooth structure, acting as an insulator and protective barrier.
nitrogenous base an aromatic, nitrogen-containing molecule that serves as a proton acceptor, e.g., purine or pyrimidine.
ointment base a vehicle for the medicinal substances carried in an ointment.
purine b's a group of compounds of which purine is the base, including uric acid, adenine, xanthine, and theobromine.
Bases. A, Purine and some substituted purine bases occurring in nucleic acids. B, Pyrimidine and some substituted pyrimidine bases occurring in nucleic acids. From Dorland's, 2000.
pyrimidine b's a group of chemical compounds of which pyrimidine is the base, including uracil, thymine, and cytosine, which are common constituents of nucleic acids.

nitrogenous base

n.
Variant of nitrogen base.

nitrogenous base

A molecule containing nitrogen with the chemical properties of a base.

Nitrogenous bases—DNA
• Purine bases—Adenine (A), guanine (G).
• Pyrimidine bases—Cytosine (C), thymine (T).

Nitrogenous bases—RNA 
• Purine bases—Adenine (A), guanine (G).
• Pyrimidine bases—Cytosine (C), uracil (U).
References in periodicals archive ?
Each triplet of nitrogenous bases, known as a codon, on the messenger RNA represents a code for an amino acid.
Transition metals bind nucleic acid more tightly than [Mg.sup.2+] or [K.sup.+], which is largely due to the interaction with nucleophilic nitrogenous bases (N7 purine) [17].
From the results reported here, the accelerating effect of 2HT and IMZ salts can be justified, taking into consideration: (1) the presence of nitrogenous bases in both types of salts, in the imidazolinium ring and after thermal degradation occurring in vulcanization in 2HT, and (2) the increased mobility of sulfur anionic species.
Instead of using the four nitrogenous bases of DNA, in this study the researchers used three monomers .