nitric


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Related to nitric: nitric oxide, Nitrix

nitric

 [ni´trik]
pertaining to or containing nitrogen in one of its higher valences.
nitric acid a highly caustic, fuming acid that has a characteristic choking odor and can be fatal if swallowed. It is sometimes used as a cauterizing agent in the eradication of warts; large amounts of it on the skin can cause necrosis. It is also used in the form of its potassium and sodium salts. The antidote for nitric acid poisoning is liberal application of an alkali or sodium bicarbonate.
nitric oxide
1. NO, a naturally occurring gas that in the body is a short-lived dilator released from vascular epithelial cells in response to the binding of vasodilators to endothelial cell receptors; it causes inhibition of muscular contraction, and thus relaxation. Excesses of nitric oxide are toxic to cells of the central nervous system and also cause the drop in blood pressure seen in septic shock. Called also endothelial- or endothelium-derived relaxing factor.
2. a preparation of nitric oxide used together with ventilatory support or other agents in the treatment of respiratory failure due to persistent fetal circulation in term and near-term neonates; administered by inhalation.

nitric

/ni·tric/ (ni´trik) pertaining to or containing nitrogen in one of its higher valences.
nitric oxide  endothelium-derived relaxing factor; a naturally occurring gas that in the body is a short-lived dilator substance released from vascular endothelial cells in response to the binding of vasodilators; it inhibits muscular contraction and produces relaxation, and is toxic in the central nervous system. A preparation is used in the treatment of persistent fetal circulation in term and near-term neonates.

nitric

pertaining to or containing nitrogen in one of its higher valences.

nitric acid
a highly caustic, fuming acid that has a characteristic choking odor. It was used at one time in the immediate treatment of rabid animal bites to prevent rabies becoming established, and as a cauterizing agent in the eradication of various kinds of warts. It is also used in the form of its potassium and sodium salts. It can be fatal if swallowed, and large amounts of nitric acid applied to the skin can cause necrosis. The antidote for nitric acid poisoning is an alkali or sodium bicarbonate applied liberally.
nitric oxide
is produced during the ensiling process and animals in confined spaces and exposed to silo gas may develop severe respiratory disease due to irritation of the alveolar epithelium. Called also silo-filler's disease. See also atypical interstitial pneumonia.
References in periodicals archive ?
This shows that a naturally derived product can help boost nitric oxide and improve cardiovascular risk factors.
To assess whether individuals on these diets are successfully processing nitric oxide-potent foods, Berkeley Test provides an inexpensive and easy-to-use disposable saliva test strip for monitoring the conversion of plant-derived nitrate to nitrite, a necessary step in the production of nitric oxide through this dietary pathway.
Thus, loss of nitric oxide is probably not the only important change, but it may be significant in terms of effects on cardiovascular health, the researchers argued.
The importance of nitric oxide spurred the development of assays to monitor its production (1).
Again, within two hours of starting nitric oxide at 5 ppm inhalation, [P.
Using endothelial cells from umbilical cord veins, the Taiwanese scientists showed that sesamol "switches on" genes that direct the production of nitric oxide synthase, an enzyme that in turn orchestrates the production of nitric oxide.
Many patients with asthma symptoms have normal lung function tests but high levels of exhaled nitric oxide.
The bottom line: "There's no way you can reliably say that arginine increases nitric oxide where it counts," says urologist Irwin Goldstein.
Nitric oxide in the nasal airway: A new dimension in otorhinolaryngology.
However, local nitric oxide release mimics our body's own self-defense mechanism against foreign cells.
INO has marketed nitric oxide for inhalation to treat newborns suffering from hypoxic respiratory failure in the U.
But in a study of 21 consecutive UCLA lung transplant patients given 20 ppm nitric immediately postoperatively, 16 experienced no reperfusion injury and were weaned from nitric oxide and mechanical ventilation within 24 hours of transplantation, according to Abbas Ardehali, MD, who reported his group's findings at the annual meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons in San Antonio, Texas in early February.