nisin


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ni·sin

(nī'sin),
A polypeptide antibiotic produced by Streptococcus lactis; active against certain streptococci, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Clostridium difficile, and other bacteria.

nisin

(nī′sĭn)
n.
A bacteriocin produced by the bacterium Lactococcus lactis and used as a preservative in dairy products and other foods and in cosmetics.

ni·sin

(nī'sin)
A polypeptide antibiotic produced by Streptococcus lactis; active against some streptococci, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Clostridium difficile, and other bacteria.
References in periodicals archive ?
Destruction of Listeria monocytogenes in sturgeon (Acipenser transmontanus) caviar by a combination of nisin with chemical antimicrobials or moderate heat.
The application of nisin has advanced beyond its role as a food biopreservative, said researcher Yvonne Kapila, professor at University of Michigan School of Dentistry in the US.
Ukuku has been working with nisin since the early 1990s, but he only recently found that combining it with EDTA--a common preservative used in processed foods and soft drinks--and with certain GRAS organic acids produces a wash that curbs both Gram-positive bacteria (such as Listeria) and Gram-negative ones (such as Salmonella and E.
After confirming the diagnosis, animals were treated with Nisin 25 lakh IU / cow once a day by intramammary route for 3 days, a single injection of Enrofloxacin-30 ml/ cow, was injected dividing 15 ml by i/m route morning and evening.
Nisin (Figure 2), a heat-stable peptide produced by Lactococcus lactis subsp.
Many food preservatives appear to be completely safe, including, alpha tocopheral (vitamin E), ascorbic acid (vitamin C), calcium propionate, nisin, tartaric acid, and TBHQ.
E.; DELVES-BROUGHTON, J., The use of the bacteriocin, nisin, as a preservative in ricottatype cheeses to control the food-borne pathogen Listeria monocytogenes.
Keywords: Amaranth, nisin, BSA, nut proteins, pulse proteins, PAGE, tryptic digestibility