mammillary line

(redirected from nipple line)
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mam·mil·lar·y line

[TA]
a vertical line passing through the nipple on either side.
Synonym(s): linea mammillaris [TA], nipple line

mam·mil·lar·y line

(mam'i-lar-ē līn) [TA]
A vertical line that passes through the nipple on either side.
Synonym(s): nipple line.

mammillary line

An imaginary line through the center of the nipple along the long axis of the breast.
See also: line
References in periodicals archive ?
Calculation from 2x2 table revealed that absence of visual jaundice below the nipple line had sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 73.23% of ruling out significant hyperbilirubinaemia.
The study in Jordan found that visual assessment of neonatal jaundices considering the nipple line as the landmark for threshold had sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 56.07%8.
It was found that jaundice extending below the nipple line had a positive predictive value of 55% and a negative predictive value of 86% for identifying infants with bilirubin levels of more than 205 micromol/litre18.
| For the World Rugby U20 Trophy, the following trial law will apply: | Law 9.13: The acceptable height of the tackle is reduced from the line of shoulders to below the nipple line.
Dangerous tackling includes, but is not limited to, tackling or attempting to tackle an opponent above the nipple line even if the tackle starts below the nipple line.
Postoperatively, the patient regained partial return of upper extremity motor function, though demonstrated persistent paraplegia with persistent hypoesthesia below the nipple line. He was ultimately discharged to a rehabilitation center where physical and occupational therapy were initiated.
In his review of four large published studies of children presenting to emergency departments with a petechial rash, two studies totaling 408 patients concluded that no one with petechiae located only above the nipple line had invasive bacterial disease.
With a baby don't use the heel of the hand but place two fingers one finger below the nipple line and very gently do the compressions.''
However, maternal use of the Ingram icterometer and determination of jaundice in relation to the infant's nipple line are both potentially useful methods of assessing jaundice after hospital discharge.
The mothers' icterometer readings and determinations of jaundice to the nipple line or below it are compared with bilirubin levels in Table 1.
Theoretically, all women could have three or even four pairs of nipples down their tummies just like cats and dogs because we have an invisible "nipple line" along each side of the body.