nihilism

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nihilism

 [ni´ĭ-lizm]
1. an attitude of skepticism regarding traditional values and beliefs or their frank rejection.
2. a delusion of nonexistence of part or all of the self or the world. adj., adj nihilis´tic.

ni·hil·ism

(nī'il-izm, nī'hi-lizm),
1. In psychiatry, the delusion of the nonexistence of everything, especially of the self or part of the self.
2. Engagement in acts that are totally destructive to one's own purposes and those of one's group.
[L. nihil, nothing]

nihilism

/ni·hil·ism/ (ni´il-izm)
1. an attitude of skepticism regarding traditional values and beliefs or their frank rejection.
2. a delusion of nonexistence of part or all of the self or the world.nihilis´tic

nihilism

(nī′ə-lĭz′əm, nē′-)
n.
1. Philosophy The doctrine that nothing actually exists or that existence or values are meaningless.
2. Relentless negativity or cynicism suggesting an absence of values or beliefs: nihilism in postwar art.
3.
a. Political belief or action that advocates or commits violence or terrorism without discernible constructive goals.
b. also Nihilism A diffuse, revolutionary movement of mid-19th-century Russia that scorned authority and tradition and believed in reason, materialism, and radical change in society and government through terrorism and assassination.
4. Psychiatry A delusion, experienced in some mental disorders, that the world or one's mind, body, or self does not exist.

ni′hil·ist n.
ni′hil·is′tic adj.
ni′hil·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

ni·hil·ism

(nī'i-lizm)
1. psychiatry The delusion of the nonexistence of everything, especially of the self or part of the self.
2. Engagement in acts that are totally destructive to one's own purposes and those of one's group.
[L. nihil, nothing]

nihilism

1. A psychotic delusion of one's non-existence or of the non-existence of the world.
2. Extreme pessimism about the effectiveness of any form of medical treatment, especially of the use of drugs (therapeutic nihilism).
References in periodicals archive ?
The unpolitical offers a space of relativism which is precious in the deconstruction of the absolutist and nihilist essentialism of politically founded mythical distinctions of language, class, sex, gender, sexuality, ethnicity, citizenship, health, and age, at the hybrid convergence of global and local politics characterizing the decades following the world and cold wars.
Hence, nihilists would not condone a debate over what the true meaning of education is, though they might consider entering into a debate over what meaning is best assigned to education.
He similarly "had no conception of what a nihilist or an anarchist might be, and could not have told the difference between a propaganda and a potato" (299).
That is so because the nihilist is intoxicated by power.
Here, Fulkerson claims that one can be an epistemological nihilist by problematizing knowledge without being an "alethiological nihilist," one who denies that there is any truth.
Thomas Wood offers here a nihilist interpretation of Madhyamaka thought and a critique of opposed interpretations.
Anarchist, nihilist, lover, and, finally, trained (left-wing) assassin whose twelve fingers are an ever-present omen, Dimitri perambulates through his fictitious biography, a "parallel" rogue contributing nothing to conventional revisionism.
Such articles could help to inspire interest and involvement in issues of the day, and help to prevent the nihilist attitudes that impel young Australians to self-destructive behaviour.
He assumes that the reader is familiar with the inhospitable terrain and makes a second pass across it, picking up unnoticed clues as to meaning, reworking Sam's nihilist soil.
Bloom seems to regard this as a virtue; he is even willing to call Falstaff a nihilist ("his version of Christianity"), and he must be the only critic ever to believe that Beatrice and Benedick are as well, and to think it any kind of compliment--but then, he believes that "all marriages seem in Shakespeare to be headed for disaster" another breathtaking generalization, which makes the entire group of comedies not only pointless but cynical.
Kevin Smith's Clerks, another nihilist teen comedy from the same period, earned more praise than The Suburbanators (it's an American film and was accordingly hyped as the sine qua non of slacker comedies), but Burns crammed more meaning--desperation, humour, existential angst--into the aforementioned scene than Smith put in his entire movie.