nihilism


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Related to nihilism: Moral nihilism

nihilism

 [ni´ĭ-lizm]
1. an attitude of skepticism regarding traditional values and beliefs or their frank rejection.
2. a delusion of nonexistence of part or all of the self or the world. adj., adj nihilis´tic.

ni·hil·ism

(nī'il-izm, nī'hi-lizm),
1. In psychiatry, the delusion of the nonexistence of everything, especially of the self or part of the self.
2. Engagement in acts that are totally destructive to one's own purposes and those of one's group.
[L. nihil, nothing]

nihilism

/ni·hil·ism/ (ni´il-izm)
1. an attitude of skepticism regarding traditional values and beliefs or their frank rejection.
2. a delusion of nonexistence of part or all of the self or the world.nihilis´tic

nihilism

(nī′ə-lĭz′əm, nē′-)
n.
1. Philosophy The doctrine that nothing actually exists or that existence or values are meaningless.
2. Relentless negativity or cynicism suggesting an absence of values or beliefs: nihilism in postwar art.
3.
a. Political belief or action that advocates or commits violence or terrorism without discernible constructive goals.
b. also Nihilism A diffuse, revolutionary movement of mid-19th-century Russia that scorned authority and tradition and believed in reason, materialism, and radical change in society and government through terrorism and assassination.
4. Psychiatry A delusion, experienced in some mental disorders, that the world or one's mind, body, or self does not exist.

ni′hil·ist n.
ni′hil·is′tic adj.
ni′hil·is′ti·cal·ly adv.

ni·hil·ism

(nī'i-lizm)
1. psychiatry The delusion of the nonexistence of everything, especially of the self or part of the self.
2. Engagement in acts that are totally destructive to one's own purposes and those of one's group.
[L. nihil, nothing]

nihilism

1. A psychotic delusion of one's non-existence or of the non-existence of the world.
2. Extreme pessimism about the effectiveness of any form of medical treatment, especially of the use of drugs (therapeutic nihilism).
References in periodicals archive ?
This is the difference between the enervating, passive nihilism of the blinking last men, and the creative, active nihilism of the supermen, referred to in the Genealogy as the great birds of prey that snatch up tasty little lambs according to their strength and their whim.
At the end of this story, the belief in nihilism has been eliminated, though Mrs.
We find this brand of nihilism at the center of the philosophy of Leo Strauss, the intellectual godfather of many of the most powerful figures within today's contemporary conservative movement--neoconservatism.
Dombroski points to one mode of nihilism and claims that it is pure "Pirandellism.
Yet modern feminists, intoxicated by the promise of liberation from nature, religion, and society, have averted their gaze from these aspects of Nietzsche and nihilism.
Faced with such pervasive nihilism in the United States, the challenge for advocates of democracy is to dismantle the American empire, and the author believes these advocates should look to Socratic democratic traditions and our own for answers.
Nihilism says vehicles are commodities that give an individual the best deal in the prettiest wrapper.
The nihilism and theatrical reversals--the townspeople cavorting in round dances turn out to be defiant marionettes who yield too easily to the trappings of power--suggest acoustically impotent society.
If the new wisdom is correct, then all of the anomie and the alienation and the nihilism and the rest of it make a lot of sense.
Harris's adventurous debut may well be the volume that starts to show the price for assimilation, power, nihilism in our community.
It must take an incredible level of nihilism to drive at human beings with such apparent lack of concern for their well-being.
He was fascinated with Nazism, nihilism and sa do -masochism and encouraged his new girl friend to believe that normal notions of right and wrong did not apply to them.