night terror


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night terror

n.
An episode of nighttime arousal from sleep, accompanied by intense fear and agitation and not recalled after awakening. Night terrors are more common in children than in adults. Also called sleep terror.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.
The abrupt awakening from sleep with behaviour consistent with terror, which is most common in preadolescent boys, but may occur in girls and extend into adulthood
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
She added: "I would suggest that parents can be proactive, I have seen this very week a child aged four who has had nearly two years of night terrors be massively reduced by having better sleep hygiene and more importantly a much earlier 7pm-orientated bedtime."
The professor says: "Sleeping tablets can stop the night terrors by preventing the person entering deep sleep - the time when night terrors occur - but even so they are only a sticking plaster approach to the problem.
(A full bladder can precipitate a night terror or bad dream.)
A WIRRAL student fell to his death from a hotel balcony after suffering from night terrors.
A blood curdling scream may signal the onset of night terror with a host of symptoms following that clearly define the disorder: thrashing, rapid heartbeat, profuse perspiring, shouting, babbling, agitation, wild running, a blank stare, tense facial features and an expression resembling one possessed.
King says that night terrors are "quite dramatic, but innocent episodes that occur usually during the transition between light and deep sleep." They are rarely recalled by children upon awakening.
"If the night terrors happen at the same time every night, then there is something you can try to prevent them."
A.This does sound like night terrors. Some children do get them and there is no evidence that they are linked with anything upsetting in the child's life, but do make sure of this by asking his friends' parents, and seeing what the teacher at his school thinks about it.
I often have night terrors. I've died in my sleep 23 different ways.
Night terrors occur, in some degree, in 15% of children.
And experiencing night terrors doubled the risk of such problems, including hallucinations, interrupted thoughts or delusions.
A FORMER soldier slashed himself across the stomach during horrifying night terrors when he thought he was fighting in Iraq.