night soil


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night soil

human feces used for fertilizer.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

night soil

(nīt soyl)
Human feces used for fertilizer.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012
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References in periodicals archive ?
The term "night soil" seems rather strange as it was generally transported during the day.
The next day, they add hops to the night soil and ship it to the docks by barge to be taken to West Indies for use as fertiliser.
Night soil is the term used for human faeces removed at night from sewage tanks and used as fertiliser.
The reality was probably more like the past that Thomas Hardy describes, a world that featured fancy carriages as well as night soil vans, pauper's hearses, slaughterman's carts and overloaded hay wagons.
Early Victorian reality - destitute street children, raging cholera epidemics, and mounds of uncollected "night soil" in the streets - was a highly "privatized" reality.
Main drains were laid through the back paths, where previously the night soil man had called to empty the pails in the dead of night, to be tipped in the old clay pit, later to become Gilkes Street swimming baths - though no-one thought to replace the lead water pipes, the dangers of which were not realised at that time.
"Night soil" has always gone onto fields and rice paddies there.
Let us examine one Australianism--the lack of dignity associated with being one of the servant community, wherein there is no shame in being a waiter, a garbage man, or in carting night soil, but a man who is a man cannot be on equal terms serving people's whims.
The letter was received in the Sheriff's Office from the Deputy Keeper of the Adelaide Gaol who on 22 February 1881 wrote: Sir, I forward herewith a silver Medal found by Prisoner Hickey in the night soil deposited in the Olive Plantations.
England's preference for ale and beer and both countries, daily consumption of tea, as well as cleaning rituals surrounding the creation and use of toilets, practices of fertilization, and use of "night soil" ensured hygienic practices.
Petty urbanites, in particular, were able to meet almost all their daily needs from the various shops clustered around the entrances to their alleyway compounds (e.g., the "tiger store store" selling hot water) and from itinerant peddlers (e.g., the night soil collector).
In her speech titled, ''Challenging the Mountains of the World,'' Tabei is scheduled to address waste and night soil problems in the Himalayas caused by the increase in the number of climbers.