nidus


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nidus

 [ni´dus] (L.)
1. a nest or cluster.
2. the point of origin or focus of a disease process.
3. nucleus (def. 2). adj., adj ni´dal.

ni·dus

, pl.

ni·di

(nī'dŭs, nī'dī),
1. A nest.
2. The nucleus or central point of origin of a nerve.
3. A focus of infection.
4. The nucleus of a crystal; the coalescence of molecules or small particles that is the beginning of a crystal or similar solid deposit.
5. The focus of reduced density at the center of an osteoid osteoma, on bone radiographs.
[L. nest]

nidus

/ni·dus/ (ni´dus) pl. ni´di   [L.]
1. the point of origin or focus of a morbid process.
2. nucleus (2).

nidus a´vis  a depression in the cerebellum between the posterior velum and uvula.

nidus

(nī′dəs)
n. pl. ni·duses or ni·di (-dī)
1. A central point or focus of infection by bacteria or other pathogens.
2. A point or place at which something originates, accumulates, or develops, such as the center around which a calculus forms.

nidus

[nī′dəs]
Etymology: L, nest
a point or origin, focus, or nucleus of a disease process.

ni·dus

, pl. nidi (nī'dŭs, -dī)
1. A nest.
2. The nucleus or central point of origin of a nerve.
3. A focus of infection.
4. The coalescence of molecules or small particles that is the beginning of a crystal or similar solid deposit.
5. The focus of reduced density at the center of an osteoid osteoma, on bone radiographs.
[L. nest]

nidus

A localized collection, or focus, of infective organisms. From the Latin nidus , a nest.

nidus

focus, e.g. a small defined area

ni·dus

, pl. nidi (nī'dŭs, -dī)
1. A nest.
2. Nucleus or central point of origin of a nerve.
3. Focus of infection.
[L. nest]

nidus (nī´dus),

n the focal point; an originating position or nucleus.

nidus

pl. nidi [L.]
1. a nest; point of origin or focus of a morbid process, e.g. a urolith, a local infection.
2. nucleus (2).
References in periodicals archive ?
Spinal vascular malformations are classified into two groups based on the vascular anatomy: fistulae and AVM with a nidus (see aforementioned AVM section).
Nidus was created to expedite commercialization of agricultural and energy discoveries through the collaboration of multiple companies and entrepreneurs, working together to select and advance the most promising technologies and take them along the path to product launch.
Of the number of approaches adopted for development of infection resistant medical devices, a successful device will prevent bacterial adhesion and biofilm formation as biofilms on devices are the nidus of infection.
For example, many tumors show intratumoral ossification, including some with a central nidus of sclerotic bone surrounded by a radiolucent halo similar to osteoid osteoma (Figure 1).
BT incelemede gozlenen nidus varligi osteoid osteoma tanisi icin yeterli olup, Manyetik Rezonans Goruntuleme gibi ileri tetkik metotlari gereksizdir.
Tan and Brathwaite were negligent in the care and treatment rendered with a retroperitoneal hematoma; causing a pancreas injury and failure; causing an inflammatory nidus and pancreatic pseudocyst; causing a pancreaticocolenic fistula; causing Paul to undergo an exploratory laparotomy and drainage of a large intra-abdominal abscess and closure of a colonic fistula, and causing Paul to undergo a colostomy and colostomy take-down surgical procedure to the pancreas.
The meticulous debridement of injured tissues has remained of utmost importance in combat wounds as nonviable tissue has been known to create a nidus for infection and may impede the natural healing process.
Certain sites of primary infection may provide a nidus for bacterial invasion: recent upper or lower respiratory tract infections, prior major trauma, disruption of cutaneous barriers due to lacerations, burns, surgery or decubiti ulcers and the presence of foreign material such as nasal packing, barrier contraceptives, tampons, arteriovenous fistulas, indwelling catheters, prosthetic joints and mechanical ventilation are all associated with an increased risk for sepsis.
When this crystallizes in the urine, it forms the beginning, or nidus, of a kidney stone that may grow larger over time.
The terms pilus and nidus imply a nest of hair; while hairs may occasionally be found within the abscessed area, their presence is not required or necessarily expected.
the critical value can serve as a nidus or a launching part for the whole issue of interpretive laboratory medicine, interpretive clinical pathology, because all of us in pathology know that large numbers of clinicians haven't the foggiest notion how to properly order laboratory tests or how to interpret them correctly.