nidus


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nidus

 [ni´dus] (L.)
1. a nest or cluster.
2. the point of origin or focus of a disease process.
3. nucleus (def. 2). adj., adj ni´dal.

ni·dus

, pl.

ni·di

(nī'dŭs, nī'dī),
1. A nest.
2. The nucleus or central point of origin of a nerve.
3. A focus of infection.
4. The nucleus of a crystal; the coalescence of molecules or small particles that is the beginning of a crystal or similar solid deposit.
5. The focus of reduced density at the center of an osteoid osteoma, on bone radiographs.
[L. nest]

nidus

/ni·dus/ (ni´dus) pl. ni´di   [L.]
1. the point of origin or focus of a morbid process.
2. nucleus (2).

nidus a´vis  a depression in the cerebellum between the posterior velum and uvula.

nidus

(nī′dəs)
n. pl. ni·duses or ni·di (-dī)
1. A central point or focus of infection by bacteria or other pathogens.
2. A point or place at which something originates, accumulates, or develops, such as the center around which a calculus forms.

nidus

[nī′dəs]
Etymology: L, nest
a point or origin, focus, or nucleus of a disease process.

ni·dus

, pl. nidi (nī'dŭs, -dī)
1. A nest.
2. The nucleus or central point of origin of a nerve.
3. A focus of infection.
4. The coalescence of molecules or small particles that is the beginning of a crystal or similar solid deposit.
5. The focus of reduced density at the center of an osteoid osteoma, on bone radiographs.
[L. nest]

nidus

A localized collection, or focus, of infective organisms. From the Latin nidus , a nest.

nidus

focus, e.g. a small defined area

ni·dus

, pl. nidi (nī'dŭs, -dī)
1. A nest.
2. Nucleus or central point of origin of a nerve.
3. Focus of infection.
[L. nest]

nidus (nī´dus),

n the focal point; an originating position or nucleus.

nidus

pl. nidi [L.]
1. a nest; point of origin or focus of a morbid process, e.g. a urolith, a local infection.
2. nucleus (2).
References in periodicals archive ?
The goal of AVM embolization is to obliterate the nidus while simultaneously minimizing non-target embolization.
Fish bone as a nidus for stone formation in the common bile duct: report of two cases.
The treatment consists of removal of the tumor along with the nidus.
Endogenous materials may include dried nasal secretions, such as mucus, desquamated epithelium, blood clots, and, rarely, an ectopic tooth, any of which materials might provide a nidus for the deposition of minerals (1).
Histologically, these lesions are made from dense trabeculae of the spongious bone, sometimes forming a nidus that cannot communicate with the bone marrow [12].
CT scan showed central radiolucent nidus with surrounding sclerosis suggestive of osteoid osteoma in the left acetabulum.
2,3) Sarcoidosis usually occurs in red (cinnabar), black (ferric oxide), or blue-black areas of tattoos, (4) in which the pigment acts as a nidus for granuloma formation.
The name of the fossil is derived from the Latin Nidus, meaning 'bird's nest' or 'fancied resemblance to' and adelric, derived from the Old English personal name 'Aedelic' -- 'adel', meaning 'noble' and 'ric' meaning 'a ruler'- which is a source for the name Aldridge.
A dose of 22 Gy was prescribed to the 56% isodose and delivered in three fractions on the nidus at C1 level, and 18 Gy was prescribed to the 60% isodose and delivered in two fractions on the nidus at C2 level.
Entertainment will be provided by a Welsh National Opera string ensemble, renowned Welsh folk group Mabon and the award-winning Gwent-based Nidus Children's choir.