nickel dermatitis

nick·el der·ma·ti·tis

allergic dermatitis due to contact with, or in some cases ingestion of, nickel or other metals containing nickel (for example, stainless steel).

nickel dermatitis

A severe allergic eczema caused by direct contact of the skin with the metal nickel. With the decline in nickel plating of articles such as watch straps, underwear fastenings and spectacle frames, the condition has become rare.
References in periodicals archive ?
In men, nickel dermatitis is predominantly an occupational disease.2 In women, the most common cause of nickel dermatitis is direct contact primarily from jewelry, garments, spectacles, wrist watches and household environment.1,3-5 Nickel dermatitis is a global problem.4 It may present as primary or secondary eruptions.5
Nickel dermatitis may start simultaneously in several regions for example under jean studs, brassiere fasteners and earrings.5
Nickel dermatitis is common domestically and internationally.
(4,5) Even in non-smokers, secondhand smoke can expose the body to nickel, which can potentially lead to nickel dermatitis. (18) Jewelry and piercings are another major source of nickel sensitization.
Quantitative aspects of nickel dermatitis: sensitization and eliciting threshold concentrations.
Nickel dermatitis is increasingly common Nickel is a leading cause of allergic contact dermatitis and is responsible for more cases than all other metals combined.
Certain occupations with high exposure to nickel, such as cashiers, hairdressers, metal workers, domestic cleaners, food handlers, bar workers, and painters, are also at risk for acquiring nickel dermatitis. (7) Patients with atopic eczema are also at increased risk?
Occupational nickel dermatitis in the electroforming industry.
Bracelets, necklaces and watches you have worn for years can suddenly cause 'nickel dermatitis'.
In Finland, among 500 school girls aged 7 to 17 years, the incidence of nickel hypersensitivity was 20 % in those with pierced ears and 2% in the subjects without.4 In an unselected Danish population study, sensitization to nickel was found in 14.8% of those with pierced ears as compared to 1.8% among those without pierced ears.5 The incidence of nickel allergy in women has been doubling every 10 years and is now around 30%.6 In women, the most common cause of nickel dermatitis is direct contact primarily from jewellery, garments, spectacles, wrist watches, and the household environment.
Calnan classified nickel dermatitis into two groups.