newborn jaundice

neonatal jaundice

Yellowing of a newborn’s skin during the neonatal period, which is caused by an increased bilirubin level in the blood, due to immaturity of liver function plus destruction of red cells. Neonatal jaundice appears between days 2 and 5 and clears by 2 weeks, and is more common in premature infants.
 
DiffDx
Nonphysiologic, prolonged, or pathologic jaundice in newborn, biliary atresia, ABO and/or Rh incompatibility, galactosaemia, cephalhaematoma, polycythemia, G6PD deficiency, neonatal sepsis, congenital infection (CMV), toxoplasmosis, syphilis, herpes, rubella, late-pregnancy use of sulfa drugs by mother, Crigler-Najjar syndrome, hereditary spherocytosis, cystic fibrosis, breast-milk jaundice, pyruvate kinase deficiency, thalassaemia, Gilbert’s syndrome, congenital hypothyroidism, Lucey-Driscoll syndrome, Gaucher’s disease, Niemann-Pick disease.

newborn jaundice

Breast milk jaundice Physiologic jaundice of the newborn, see there, aka breast milk jaundice.
References in periodicals archive ?
Product offerings include computerized neurodiagnostic systems for audiology, neurology, polysomnography, and neonatology, as well as newborn care products such as hearing screening systems, phototherapy devices for the treatment of newborn jaundice, head-cooling products for the treatment of brain injury in newborns, incubators to control the newborn's environment, and software systems for managing and tracking disorders and diseases for public health laboratories.
First, we need to raise awareness among parents and health care providers about prolonged newborn jaundice and inform them that jaundice with pale stools is highly indicative of an obstructive type pathologic jaundice.
Newborn jaundice is a common and usually benign condition that manifests in infants due, in part, to undeveloped enzyme systems for conjugating bilirubin.
A study from a National Institutes of Health research network found that an early treatment to prevent severe newborn jaundice in extremely early preterm infants reduced the infantsa[euro](tm) rate of brain injury, a serious complication of severe jaundice.
Newborn jaundice, a usually benign condition that typically resolves with supervision and appropriate nutritional intake, can progress to severe hyperbilirubinemia in ~8-10% of healthy newborn infants.
All healthy newborns are at potential risk of kernicterus if their newborn jaundice is unmonitored and/or managed inappropriately.
Newborn jaundice is the result of an abnormal accumulation of bilirubin, a yellow pigment that is one of the breakdown products of hemoglobin, the oxygen-carrying component of blood.
Product offerings include computerized neurodiagnostic systems for audiology, neurology, polysomnography, and neonatalogy, as well as newborn care products such as hearing screening systems, phototherapy devices for the treatment of newborn jaundice, head-cooling products for the treatment of brain injury in newborns, incubators to control the newborn's environment, and software systems for managing and tracking disorders and diseases for public health laboratories.
Although most newborn jaundice results from physiological immaturity, the laboratory must be prepared to help rule-out other causes of hyperbilirubinemia, including infectious diseases and in utero blood group incompatibility with the mother.
Currently, he serves as Chairman of the Board of Natus Medical Incorporated, a leading provider of healthcare products used for screening, detection, treatment, monitoring and tracking of common medical ailments such as hearing impairment, neurological dysfunction, epilepsy, sleep disorders, newborn jaundice and newborn metabolic testing and a member of the Board of Directors of PortalPlayer, Inc.
In the last few years, the Centers for Disease Control and the Joint Commission on the Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations have issued alerts to all accredited hospitals and public health professionals in the United States saying that all healthy infants are at potential risk of kernicterus if their newborn jaundice is not monitored and not adequately treated.
Sue Sheridan's introduction to safety issues -- and her motivation to make a difference -- came through two grave medical errors experienced in her immediate family, which led to her son Cal's permanent disability from untreated newborn jaundice, known as kernicterus, in 1995 and her husband Patrick's death in 2002 from a failure to communicate a diagnosis of cancer.