neutrophil

(redirected from Neutrophils)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to Neutrophils: Lymphocytes, Monocytes, Basophils, Eosinophils

neutrophil

 [noo´tro-fil]
1. any cell, structure, or histologic element readily stainable with neutral dyes.
Neutrophil maturation. From Ignatavicius and Workman, 2002.
2. a granular leukocyte having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing very fine granules; called also polymorphonuclear leukocyte and neutrophilic leukocyte. See also heterophil.
band neutrophil band cell.
stab neutrophil band cell.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl),
1. A mature white blood cell in the granulocytic series, formed by myelopoietic tissue of the bone marrow (sometimes also in extramedullary sites), and released into the circulating blood, where they normally represent 54-65% of the total number of leukocytes. When stained with the usual Romanowsky-type dyes neutrophils are characterized by a nucleus dark purple-blue nucleus, lobated (three to five distinct lobes joined by thin strands of chromatin), with a rather coarse network of fairly dense chromatin; and a cytoplasm that is faintly pink (sharply contrasted with the nucleus) that contains numerous fine pink or violet-pink granules, that is, not acidophilic or basophilic (as in eosinophils or basophils). The precursors of neutrophils, in order of increasing maturity, are: myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, and band forms. Although the terms neutrophilic leukocytes and neutrophilic granulocytes include younger cells in which neutrophilic granules are recognized, the two expressions are frequently used as synonyms for neutrophils, which are mature forms unless otherwise indicated by a modifying term, such as immature neutrophil.
See also: leukocyte, leukocytosis.
2. Any cell or tissue that manifests no special affinity for acid or basic dyes, that is, the cytoplasm stains approximately equally with either type of dye.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]

neutrophil

(no͞o′trə-fĭl′, nyo͞o′-)
adj.
Not stained strongly or definitely by either acid or basic dyes but stained readily by neutral dyes. Used especially of white blood cells.
n.
A neutrophil cell, especially an abundant type of granular white blood cell that is highly destructive of microorganisms.

neu′tro·phile′ (-fīl′), neu′tro·phil′ic (-fĭl′ĭk) adj.

neutrophil

 A phagocytic WBC, normally constituting 60-70% of circulating WBCs. See Band, Dysplastic neutrophil, Hypersegmented neutrophil, Polymorphonuclear neutrophil.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl)
1. A mature white blood cell in the granulocytic series, formed by bone marrow and released into the circulating blood, where neutrophils normally represent from 54 to 65% of the total number of leukocytes in a differential. When stained, neutrophils are characterized by: 1) a nucleus that is dark purple-blue and lobated; 2) a cytoplasm that is faintly pink and contains numerous fine pink or violet-pink granules. The precursors of neutrophils in order of increasing maturity, are: myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, and band forms.
See also: leukocyte, leukocytosis
2. Any cell or tissue that manifests no special affinity for acid or basic dyes, i.e., the cytoplasm stains approximately equally with either type of dye.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]

neutrophil

, neutrophile (noo'tro-fil?, nu') (-fil?) [ neutro- + -phile],

NE

Enlarge picture
NEUTROPHILS: two segmented neutrophils
A granular white blood cell (WBC), the most common type (55% to 70%) of WBC. Neutrophils are responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. They play a primary role in inflammation, are readily attracted to foreign antigens (chemotaxis), and destroy them by phagocytosis. Neutrophils killed during inflammation release destructive enzymes and toxic oxygen radicals that eradicate infectious microorganisms. An inadequate number of neutrophils (neutropenia) leaves the body at high risk for infection from many sources and requires protective precautions on the part of health care workers. Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, which destroys leukocytes, must be carefully protected from infections during the course of therapy and until the bone marrow produces additional leukocytes.

As part of a severe inflammatory response or autoimmune disorder, neutrophils may begin attacking normal cells and cause tissue damage. This occurs in adult respiratory distress syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Corticosteroids are the most commonly used drugs to minimize the damage caused by severe inflammation. Synonym: neutrophilic leukocyte See: illustration; blood for illus.

polysegmented neutrophil

Polymorphonuclear leukocyte.illustration

neutrophil

A white blood cell of the granulocyte group, with a multilobed (polymorph) nucleus and numerous granules in the CYTOPLASM that stain neither red with eosin nor blue with basic dyes. Neutrophils are the major circulating PHAGOCYTES of the granulocyte group. Compare EOSINOPHIL and BASOPHIL.

neutrophil

the most common type of white blood cell (LEUCOCYTES) formed in the bone marrow and with a normal count in human blood of between 2500 and 7500 cells per mm3. They have lobed nuclei and granular cytoplasm. Neutrophils are PHAGOCYTES, and are important in combating bacterial infections.

Neutrophil

The primary type of white blood cell involved in inflammation. Neutrophils are a type of granulocyte, also known as a polymorphonuclear leukocyte.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl)
A mature white blood cell in granulocytic series, formed by myelopoietic tissue of bone marrow and released into circulating blood.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]
References in periodicals archive ?
A few fresh isolated and purified re-suspended neutrophils were observed by Wright's staining under the optical microscope at high magnification and oil immersion lens.
Such data could then be used as reference ranges for interpreting neutrophil counts in Indo-Asian newborns.
Eight of 11 cases (72%) in the study group showed detached intracytoplasmic inclusions in mature neutrophils consistent with Howell-Jolly body-like inclusions (Figure, a through d).
Neutrophil count and NLR were significantly higher in the patient group than in the control group (p<0.001, p=0.001, respectively).
Neutrophils were stained with APC-Ly6G, and platelets were stained with FITC-CD41 to detect the interactions of neutrophils and platelets.
By acting as tiny neutrophil decoys, they intercept cytokines and stop them from signaling even more neutrophils to the joints, reducing inflammation and joint damage.
When levels of SDF-1 decrease, neutrophils are released from marrow.
Neutrophils exposed to Staphylococcus aureus form rapid NETs without lysing [8].
In our case, tumor cells revealed abundant neutrophils in their cytoplasm and in the surrounding stroma.
In May 2010, the patient presented with urinary tract infection (UTI) caused by Escherichia coli with an observed increase in the levels of neutrophil CD64.
In this work, we studied the effect of insulin, glucagon, and 17[beta]-estradiol (E2) on secretion of human neutrophils upon adhesion to fibronectin.
Neutrophils are major components in the synovial fluid of RA patients making up to 90% of cells.