neutrophil


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Related to neutrophil: hypersegmented neutrophil

neutrophil

 [noo´tro-fil]
1. any cell, structure, or histologic element readily stainable with neutral dyes.
Neutrophil maturation. From Ignatavicius and Workman, 2002.
2. a granular leukocyte having a nucleus with three to five lobes connected by threads of chromatin, and cytoplasm containing very fine granules; called also polymorphonuclear leukocyte and neutrophilic leukocyte. See also heterophil.
band neutrophil band cell.
stab neutrophil band cell.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl),
1. A mature white blood cell in the granulocytic series, formed by myelopoietic tissue of the bone marrow (sometimes also in extramedullary sites), and released into the circulating blood, where they normally represent 54-65% of the total number of leukocytes. When stained with the usual Romanowsky-type dyes neutrophils are characterized by a nucleus dark purple-blue nucleus, lobated (three to five distinct lobes joined by thin strands of chromatin), with a rather coarse network of fairly dense chromatin; and a cytoplasm that is faintly pink (sharply contrasted with the nucleus) that contains numerous fine pink or violet-pink granules, that is, not acidophilic or basophilic (as in eosinophils or basophils). The precursors of neutrophils, in order of increasing maturity, are: myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, and band forms. Although the terms neutrophilic leukocytes and neutrophilic granulocytes include younger cells in which neutrophilic granules are recognized, the two expressions are frequently used as synonyms for neutrophils, which are mature forms unless otherwise indicated by a modifying term, such as immature neutrophil.
See also: leukocyte, leukocytosis.
2. Any cell or tissue that manifests no special affinity for acid or basic dyes, that is, the cytoplasm stains approximately equally with either type of dye.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]

neutrophil

(no͞o′trə-fĭl′, nyo͞o′-)
adj.
Not stained strongly or definitely by either acid or basic dyes but stained readily by neutral dyes. Used especially of white blood cells.
n.
A neutrophil cell, especially an abundant type of granular white blood cell that is highly destructive of microorganisms.

neu′tro·phile′ (-fīl′), neu′tro·phil′ic (-fĭl′ĭk) adj.

neutrophil

 A phagocytic WBC, normally constituting 60-70% of circulating WBCs. See Band, Dysplastic neutrophil, Hypersegmented neutrophil, Polymorphonuclear neutrophil.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl)
1. A mature white blood cell in the granulocytic series, formed by bone marrow and released into the circulating blood, where neutrophils normally represent from 54 to 65% of the total number of leukocytes in a differential. When stained, neutrophils are characterized by: 1) a nucleus that is dark purple-blue and lobated; 2) a cytoplasm that is faintly pink and contains numerous fine pink or violet-pink granules. The precursors of neutrophils in order of increasing maturity, are: myeloblasts, promyelocytes, myelocytes, metamyelocytes, and band forms.
See also: leukocyte, leukocytosis
2. Any cell or tissue that manifests no special affinity for acid or basic dyes, i.e., the cytoplasm stains approximately equally with either type of dye.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]

neutrophil

, neutrophile (noo'tro-fil?, nu') (-fil?) [ neutro- + -phile],

NE

Enlarge picture
NEUTROPHILS: two segmented neutrophils
A granular white blood cell (WBC), the most common type (55% to 70%) of WBC. Neutrophils are responsible for much of the body's protection against infection. They play a primary role in inflammation, are readily attracted to foreign antigens (chemotaxis), and destroy them by phagocytosis. Neutrophils killed during inflammation release destructive enzymes and toxic oxygen radicals that eradicate infectious microorganisms. An inadequate number of neutrophils (neutropenia) leaves the body at high risk for infection from many sources and requires protective precautions on the part of health care workers. Cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, which destroys leukocytes, must be carefully protected from infections during the course of therapy and until the bone marrow produces additional leukocytes.

As part of a severe inflammatory response or autoimmune disorder, neutrophils may begin attacking normal cells and cause tissue damage. This occurs in adult respiratory distress syndrome, inflammatory bowel disease, myocarditis, and rheumatoid arthritis. Corticosteroids are the most commonly used drugs to minimize the damage caused by severe inflammation. Synonym: neutrophilic leukocyte See: illustration; blood for illus.

polysegmented neutrophil

Polymorphonuclear leukocyte.illustration

neutrophil

A white blood cell of the granulocyte group, with a multilobed (polymorph) nucleus and numerous granules in the CYTOPLASM that stain neither red with eosin nor blue with basic dyes. Neutrophils are the major circulating PHAGOCYTES of the granulocyte group. Compare EOSINOPHIL and BASOPHIL.

neutrophil

the most common type of white blood cell (LEUCOCYTES) formed in the bone marrow and with a normal count in human blood of between 2500 and 7500 cells per mm3. They have lobed nuclei and granular cytoplasm. Neutrophils are PHAGOCYTES, and are important in combating bacterial infections.

Neutrophil

The primary type of white blood cell involved in inflammation. Neutrophils are a type of granulocyte, also known as a polymorphonuclear leukocyte.

neu·tro·phil

, neutrophile (nū'trō-fil, -fīl)
A mature white blood cell in granulocytic series, formed by myelopoietic tissue of bone marrow and released into circulating blood.
[neutro- + G. philos, fond]
References in periodicals archive ?
GM-CSF and G-CSF Both Enhance the Neutrophil Migration in RA.
Priming of the neutrophil respiratory burst: Role in host defense and inflammation.
Inflammatory cytokines which released by inflammatory cells after stimulus may interact with neutrophil and lymphocyte production in bone marrow.
A minimum of 300 neutrophils and myeloid precursors from each bone marrow aspirate smear and 20 neutrophils from each peripheral blood smear were screened.
that neutrophil and lymphocyte counts and NLR were significantly higher in patients with acute ischemic and haemorrhagic stroke than in transient ischemic attack patients.5
The present study has shown that various CBC parameters, including WBC, neutrophil, and platelet counts; plateletcrit level; and NLR and PLR ratios, were significantly higher in ECs with LNI.
They perform crucial effects on cell proliferation, neutrophil recruitment, and enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokines' release.[22],[23],[24] In addition, MIP-1a was mainly produced by hematopoietic cells (such as monocytes, macrophages, T lymphocytes, and B lymphocytes), and MIP-2 was secreted by both hematopoietic cells and nonhematopoietic cells.[25] Therefore, a possible reason why PDX could not regulate the release of MIP-2 may be associated with its binding on selective or specific cells.
To make the neutrophil nanosponges, the researchers first developed a method to separate neutrophils from whole blood.
(2007) 'Novel cell death program leads to neutrophil extracellular traps.
Some of the neutrophils in the tumor cells revealed degenerative changes by high-power field (x1000) microscopic evaluation (Figures 2-4), while some neutrophils included apoptotic bodies.
In May 2011, treatment with antibiotics was associated with slight fever, elevated serum CRP, and continuous elevation of neutrophil CD64 (up to 18,831 molecules/cell) (Figure 3).
Ficoll-Paque for neutrophil isolation was obtained from Pharmacia (Uppsala, Sweden).