neuter

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neuter

(no͞o′tər, nyo͞o′-)
adj.
1. Grammar
a. Neither masculine nor feminine in gender.
b. Neither active nor passive; intransitive. Used of verbs.
2. Biology
a. Having undeveloped or nonfunctional sexual organs: the neuter caste in social insects.
b. Having pistils and stamens that are nonfunctional or absent.
3. Castrated or spayed. Used of animals.
4. Androgynous or asexual.
n.
1. An androgynous or asexual person.
2. A castrated animal.
3. An insect that has undeveloped or nonfunctional sexual organs, such as a worker bee.
tr.v. neu·tered, neu·tering, neu·ters
To castrate or spay.

neu·ter

(nū'tĕr)
To sterilize a male or female animal surgically.
[L. neither, i.e. neither male nor female]

neuter

an organism having nonfunctional or absent sexual parts. In plants, a neuter is one without male and female flower parts (e.g. ray florets of sunflower). A neuter in animals is one that is sexually undeveloped or sterile, for example the female worker in a bee colony, or a castrated or spayed animal.

neuter

1. to desex an animal. This has assumed an important role in the management and control of companion animal populations. castration and ovariohysterectomy are the usual procedures.
2. a desexed animal.
3. a castrated male cat.
References in periodicals archive ?
Benninger hopes the film will inspire people to become involved with saving more cats through a non-lethal technique called TNR (trap, neuter and return).
At a time when pet overpopulation is reaching new highs, and when it is difficult enough to convince men to spay and neuter their animals, this event was a great idea.
In 2005, the coalition helped alter approximately 4,300 homeless cats through a non-lethal technique called TNR (trap, neuter and return).
The club approached Boks a month ago with an offer to donate proceeds of the live band and bikini event near the Kodak Theatre to city shelter spay and neuter programs.
Boks said he hoped to raise another $1 million a year to spay and neuter the pets of needy residents to make Los Angeles a no-kill city.
Since the aggressive implementation of local spay and neuter programs in 1973 across America, millions of animals have potentially been saved from euthanasia.