neurotypical


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neurotypical

(no͝or′ō-tĭp′ĭ-kəl, nyo͝or′-)
adj.
1. Not having a neurodevelopmental disorder, especially autism spectrum disorder: neurotypical students.
2. Relating to or characteristic of people who do not have a neurodevelopmental disorder, especially autism spectrum disorder: neurotypical behavior.
n.
A person who is neurotypical.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bernstein joins other contemporaries who believe most on the autism spectrum are as perplexed about us, the neurotypicals, as we are of them.
Sometimes it takes another person with your specific disability label, not another neurotypical teacher or peer, to help the world understand your experience.
Researchers long have known that neurotypical children as young as 18 months old look at a person's eyes and follow their gaze in order to associate a spoken word with the object the person is looking at.
There is another important aspect to this, which can only be sketched here, related to working with clients outside the neurotypical spectrum.
Breaking learned troublesome sleep behavior is a struggle for parents with neurotypical children; in children with ASD, this might be even more difficult because of underlying disrupted neurologic, cognitive, and behavioral components.
Here, Rizwan's Asperger's comes into play, for in addition to following a strict regimented schedule, never lying, and not being able to understand jokes or irony, it allows him to express his religiosity without the filter of self-conscious embarrassment that neurotypical people may feel.
The chapter on drugs essentially serves as a harm reduction guide for the substances most likely to be offered in party settings, with special note of how a person with ASD might react differently than a neurotypical person.
Feeding problems are more prevalent in children with developmental disabilities than in neurotypical children (Provost, Crowe, Osbourn, McClain, & Skipper, 2010; Sharp et al.
10) We looked at many different studies to determine what mutations are more commonly found in autistic patients, but not found in the neurotypical, nonautistic public.
When compared to neurotypical children, those with ASD encounter greater challenges to living a healthy life (Kuhlthau, Orlich, Hall, Sikora, Kovac, Delahyde & Clemons, 2009).
Virtually any solution that supports distinctive thinkers can also provide equal benefit to neurotypical learners across a diverse spectrum of needs.
Some students with disabilities have a higher risk of experiencing pain as a result of medical conditions and procedures than do neurotypical children, and some children with intellectual or developmental disabilities commonly experience daily pain (Dowling, 2004; Solodiuk & Curley, 2003; Stallard, Williams, Lenton, & Velleman, 2001).