neurotoxin


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neurotoxin

 [noor´o-tok″sin]
a substance that is poisonous or destructive to nerve tissue.

neu·ro·tox·in

(nū'rō-tok'sin),
1. Synonym(s): neurolysin
2. Any toxin that acts specifically on nervous tissue.

neurotoxin

/neu·ro·tox·in/ (noor´o-tok″sin) a substance that is poisonous or destructive to nerve tissue.

neurotoxin

(no͝or′ō-tŏk′sĭn, nyo͝or′-)
n.
A toxin that damages or destroys nerve tissue.

neu′ro·tox′ic (-tŏk′sĭk) adj.
neu′ro·tox·ic′i·ty (-tŏk-sĭs′ĭ-tē) n.

neurotoxin

[noo͡r′ōtok′sin]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + toxikon, poison
a toxin that acts directly on the tissues of the central nervous system, traveling along the axis cylinders of the motor nerves to the brain. The toxin may be secreted in the venom of certain snakes, or it may be present on the spines of a shell or in the flesh of fish or shellfish; it may be produced by certain bacteria or by the cellular disintegration of certain bacteria.

neurotoxin

Toxicology A substance that is toxic or destroys nerve tissue–eg, exotoxins, present in plants and animals and either block conduction of the nerve impulse or synaptic transmission, by binding to the voltage-gated Na+ channel protein or ↑ neuronal activity. See Conotoxin, Conus, Puffer fish, Red tide, Shiga neurotoxin.

neu·ro·tox·in

(nūr'ō-tok'sin)
1. Synonym(s): neurolysin.
2. Any toxin that acts specifically on nervous tissue.

Neurotoxin

A substance that damages, destroys, or impairs the functioning of nerve tissue.
Mentioned in: Fugu Poisoning

neurotoxin (nerˈ·ō·täkˑ·sin),

n a poisonous substance that damages tissues within the central nervous system; produced by certain bacteria or by the cellular deterioration of some bacteria. Other naturally occurring neurotoxins are present in the venom of some snakes, the spines of particular shells, or the skin of a shellfish or fish. Many drugs and chemicals are also neurotoxic.

neurotoxin

a substance that is poisonous or destructive to nerve tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
The success of this development will potentially be the first US FDA approved microchannel delivery of neurotoxins for the peri-orbital region in the US.
Static, etched-in rhytids may take longer to correct and may require repeat injections, whereas dynamic rhytids will respond well to neurotoxins, he added.
The use of botulinum neurotoxins has revolutionized the treatment of several different problems seen in the plastic surgeon's office, from facial wrinkles to painful conditions with limited treatment options," comments lead author Marie E.
Crystal structure of botulinum neurotoxin type A and implications for toxicity.
It is believed that some sort of disturbance of the infant gut flora occurs at the same time as exposure to spores, providing a window of opportunity for spores in the gut to grow and produce neurotoxin.
From microbotox to migraines to multiple sclerosis, the uses and markets for neurotoxins will continue to expand in 2012.
The neurotoxin is released as a single polypeptide chain of 150 kDa, which is later nicked to generate two disulphide linked fragments, the heavy chain (H, 100 kDa) and light chain (L, 50 kDa) (Fig.
Researchers thought that a neurotoxin produced by bacteria in some plants was consumed by a high amount of the Chamorro people causing this illness.
After this training, researchers hit the right side of the monkeys' brains with MPTP, a neurotoxin that selectively kills neurons that produce the signaling chemical dopamine.
Treatment options for the 175,000-210,000, or one in four, Gulf War veterans suffering from the effects of neurotoxin exposure remain few and ineffective.
Mercury is a dangerous neurotoxin associated with industrial activities.
ON THURSDAY I read on page six of the Examiner about the British Dental Association's desire to introduce the neurotoxin fluoride into the water of the poorer parts of the country, including Kirklees.