neurotoxic


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neu·ro·tox·ic

(nū'rō-tok'sik),
Poisonous to substances in the nervous system.

neurotoxic

[noo͡r′ōtok′sik]
having a poisonous effect on nerves and nerve cells, such as the degenerative effect of ingested lead on peripheral nerves.

neurotoxic

adjective Referring to substances or activities with an adverse effect on the nervous system, leading to increased excitability, numbness, muscle cramps, paraesthesias, systemic failure or cardiac arrest.

neurotoxic

adjective Referring to substances or activities with an adverse effect on the nervous system, leading to ↑ excitability, numbness, muscle cramps, paresthesias, systemic failure or cardiac arrest. Cf Hematoxic.

neu·ro·tox·ic

(nūr'ō-tok'sik)
Poisonous to nervous tissue.

neurotoxic

pertaining to or emanating from a neurotoxin.

neurotoxic state
a case of poisoning by a neurotoxin.
References in periodicals archive ?
rarely have been involved in the management and treatment of venomous snakebites due to the availability of effective antivenoms for neurotoxic coral snake bites.
The prolonged presence of the shoulder roll in combination with the arm positioning could have loaded the nerve structures to the point of injury, especially in the context of previous exposure to neurotoxic chemotherapy.
Age-related impairment of CSF production and clearance may lead to the accumulation of neurotoxic proteins, and therefore could play a significant role in the progression of Alzheimer's disease.
This suggests that lamotrigine may be effective in limiting peripheral neuropathy pain in persons on neurotoxic antiviral drugs.
Manganese, like lead, is neurotoxic and at high doses has been found to cause disabling neurological impairments in speech and movement," says Barbara McElgunn, health liaison officer with the Learning Disabilities Association of Canada, a member of the Coalition for Bill C-29.
Recent refinements of neuropathologic techniques, meticulous validation of behavioral tests, and introduction of the tools of molecular biology have led to rapid progress in our understanding of the mechanisms and consequences of neurotoxic injury.
Venomous snakes in southern Africa can, in broad terms, be divided into 3 groups: cytotoxic, neurotoxic and those that can induce haemostatic toxic effects.
Acai could also counteract the neurotoxic effects of the herbicide paraquat on the flies.
In 14 chapters, psychologists, psychiatrists, and other specialists from North America and Australia describe common injuries sustained in the workplace that can cause cognitive impairment, such as traumatic brain injury, sports concussion, electrical injury, exposure to neurotoxic substances, posttraumatic stress, depression, chronic pain, and brain and psychological injuries experienced in combat.
Lead (Pb) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are neurotoxic contaminants that have been associated with impairment in response inhibition.
Less mercury means its potent neurotoxic effects are less likely to harm childhood development.
Contributors including emergency physicians, pharmacists, and other experts explain cellular and molecular processes of neurotoxic illnesses, and give advice on recognizing signs and symptoms.