neurotoxic


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

neu·ro·tox·ic

(nū'rō-tok'sik),
Poisonous to substances in the nervous system.

neurotoxic

adjective Referring to substances or activities with an adverse effect on the nervous system, leading to increased excitability, numbness, muscle cramps, paraesthesias, systemic failure or cardiac arrest.

neurotoxic

adjective Referring to substances or activities with an adverse effect on the nervous system, leading to ↑ excitability, numbness, muscle cramps, paresthesias, systemic failure or cardiac arrest. Cf Hematoxic.

neu·ro·tox·ic

(nūr'ō-tok'sik)
Poisonous to nervous tissue.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the present study common ocular manifestations of neurotoxic snake bites were ptosis followed by diplopia, ophthalmoplegia and optic neuritis, in order of decreasing incidence.
Although mild neurotoxic effects have been mentioned to occur in rinkhals bite, these have not been well documented (Fig.
Factors related to maternal neurotoxic exposure and neurodevelopment (e.g., breastfeeding) are significant in studies of children's exposure to ethylmercury (Marques a al.
This study shows that both midazolam and neostigmine, when administered intrathecally, have neurotoxic effects in rabbits.
After 2 years of follow-up, 25% of the ovarian cancer patients in the cisplatin group had residual neurotoxic effects, while "almost all patients in [the carboplatin group] had recovered," said Dr.
The AMX0035 has been shown to synergistically prevent nerve cell death and neurotoxic inflammation, hallmarks of ALS, in preclinical models.
Lead (Pb) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are neurotoxic contaminants that have been associated with impairment in response inhibition.
Their surprising results reveal that AB43 is even more abundant in the brains of AD patients than AB40, and more neurotoxic than AB42.
Some chapter topics include phenotypic expression of autism and maternal depression, a molecular mechanism for heavy metal-induced neurotoxicity, neurotoxic brainstem impairment as a proposed threshold event in autistic regression, and cytokine polymorphisms in autism.
An international research team led by Paul Cox of the National Tropical Botanical Garden based in Kalaheo, Hawaii, has suggested that the spike came from a rise in exposure to the neurotoxic amino acid [beta]-N-methylamino-L alanine (BMAA).
The same year, the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) listed fragrances as a category of chemicals that should be given high priority for neurotoxic testing.