neurotmesis


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neurotmesis

 [noor″rot-me´sis]
partial or complete severance of a nerve, with disruption of the axon and its myelin sheath and the connective tissue elements.

neu·rot·me·sis

(nū'rot-mē'sis),
A type of axon loss lesion resulting from focal peripheral nerve injury in which, at the lesion site, the nerve stroma is damaged to varying degrees, as well as the axon and myelin, which degenerate from that point distally; with the most severe neurotmesis lesions, the gross continuity of the nerve is disrupted. See: axonotmesis, neurapraxia.

neurotmesis

/neu·rot·me·sis/ (noor″ot-me´sis) partial or complete severance of a nerve, with disruption of the axon and its myelin sheath and the connective tissue elements.

neurotmesis

[noo͡r′ōtmē′sis]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + tmesis, cutting apart
a peripheral nerve injury in which the nerve is completely disrupted by laceration or traction. It requires surgical approximation, with unpredictable recovery.

neu·rot·me·sis

(nūr'ot-mē'sis)
A type of axon loss lesion resulting from focal peripheral nerve injury in which, at the lesion site, the nerve stroma is damaged to varying degrees, as well as the axon and myelin, which degenerate from that point distally.
See: axonotmesis, neurapraxia
[neuro- + G. tmēsis, a cutting]

neurotmesis

complete division of a nerve, usually as the result of accident or trauma; nerve repair does not normally occur without surgical intervention

neurotmesis

partial or complete severance of a nerve, with disruption of the axon and its myelin sheath and of the connective tissue elements.
References in periodicals archive ?
In cases of neurotmesis, the endoneural tubes are disrupted which can result in misdirected axonal regrowth (ie, synkinesis), which could potentially impact subsequent treatment where needle position is based on bony anatomic landmarks.
Neurotmesis is a complete severing of axon and connective tissue; recovery is not expected without surgical repair.
In CPN injuries related to knee dislocations, ultrasound was used to correctly diagnose neurotmesis injuries and define the extent of intraneural disruption, helping to guide treatment.
Table 1 Nerve Injury Classifications Prognosis for Sunderland Spontaneous Seddon Grade Grade Structures Injured Recovery Neuropraxia 1 Myelin Full Axonotmesis 2 Myelin, Axons Functional 3 Myelin, Axons, Endoneurium Incomplete 4 Myelin, Axons, Endoneurium, None Perineurium Neurotmesis 5 Myelin, Axons, Endoneurium, None Perineurium, Epineurium Table 2 MRC Grades of Muscle Strength Grade Motor Function 0 No movement or contraction 1 Trace movement or fasciculations 2 Active motion with gravity eliminated 3 Active motion against gravity only 4 Active motion against some resistance 5 Full strength Table 3 Summary of Incidences of Lower Extremity Nerve Injuries Traumatic Iatrogenic Femoral Nerve Acetabulum THA overall: 0.
However, the major kinds of experimental lesion to this nerve are axonotmesis by crushing (6) or neurotmesis followed by microsurgical nerve reconstruction (7).
16) showed in a case report that EMG is fundamental for the localisation of sciatic damage following THR, in order to identify the mechanism, severity and prognosis, and recommended that an exploration procedure on the nerve be performed in the event of neurotmesis.
63) showed that, in two patients with an EMG diagnosis of neurotmesis (they refused surgery), the negative prognosis was confirmed some time after the event, whereas cases of severe axonotmesis have a slow and incomplete recovery.
Neurotmesis is the interruption of neurites, myelin, and the nerve envelopes (at least the endoneurium and the perineurium, in crush injury, for example).
Much of the currentknowledge of peripheral nerve anatomy and physiology was observed by Sunderland, who developed the following classification for peripheral nerve lesions: grade I, neurapraxia; grade II, axonotmesis; grade III, mixed neurapraxia and axonotmetic lesion; grade IV, neurotmesis with continuity of the epineurium; grade V, complete nerve section.
Nerve injuries were classified by Seddon and colleagues into neuropraxia, axonotmesis, and neurotmesis.
Neurotmesis is a lesion that completely disrupts the nerve and is defined as a Sunderland Type 5 injury.