neurotmesis


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neurotmesis

 [noor″rot-me´sis]
partial or complete severance of a nerve, with disruption of the axon and its myelin sheath and the connective tissue elements.

neu·rot·me·sis

(nū'rot-mē'sis),
A type of axon loss lesion resulting from focal peripheral nerve injury in which, at the lesion site, the nerve stroma is damaged to varying degrees, as well as the axon and myelin, which degenerate from that point distally; with the most severe neurotmesis lesions, the gross continuity of the nerve is disrupted. See: axonotmesis, neurapraxia.

neu·rot·me·sis

(nūr'ot-mē'sis)
A type of axon loss lesion resulting from focal peripheral nerve injury in which, at the lesion site, the nerve stroma is damaged to varying degrees, as well as the axon and myelin, which degenerate from that point distally.
See: axonotmesis, neurapraxia
[neuro- + G. tmēsis, a cutting]
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References in periodicals archive ?
Thus, it can be inferred that all the neuropathic muscles had loss of axons suggestive of either axonotmesis or neurotmesis. Condition of neuropraxia can definitely be ruled out.
Almeida et al., "Promoting nerve regeneration in a neurotmesis rat model using poly(DL-lactide-e-caprolactone) membranes and mesenchymal stem cells from the Wharton's jelly: in vitro and in vivo analysis," BioMed Research International, vol.
In the case of incomplete neurotmesis such as crush injury, conservative therapy is usually selected because natural recovery can be expected.
In an attempt to classify the physical and functional state of the damaged nerve trunk, these injuries have also been classified into three broad categories by Seddon (5): neurapraxia, axonotmesis, and neurotmesis [Table 2].
This "N" subtype is used for any neurological deficit, such as neuropraxia, neurotmesis, and axonotmesis.
Guo et al., "Peripheral nerve repair: Monitoring by using gadofluorine M-enhanced MR imaging with chitosan nerve conduits with cultured mesenchymal stem cells in rat model of neurotmesis," Radiology, vol.
It classifies a given nerve injury, in terms of increasing severity, as neuropraxia, axonotmesis, or neurotmesis; however, most cases present the electrophysiological characteristics that are associated with mixed lesions.
Based on the degrees of damage in the nerve and surrounding connective tissue, peripheral nerve damage may be classified as neurapraxia, axonotmesis, and neurotmesis, with the latter being a severe type of peripheral nerve injury [86].
Blot, "Cutaneous saphenous nerve graft for the treatment of sciatic neurotmesis in a dog," Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, vol.
In cases of neurotmesis, the endoneural tubes are disrupted which can result in misdirected axonal regrowth (ie, synkinesis), which could potentially impact subsequent treatment where needle position is based on bony anatomic landmarks.
In the event of a dehiscent nerve canal, immediate facial palsy is indicative of neurotmesis or axonotmesis following either laser-assisted operations or cold technical manipulations.
(12,13) Seddon classified injuries into three grades: neurapraxia, axonotmesis, and neurotmesis. (12) Neurapraxia is essentially a conduction block due to demyelination.