neurotic

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neurotic

 [noo͡-rot´ik]
1. pertaining to or characterized by neurosis.
2. a person affected with a neurosis.
neurotic disorder neurosis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

neu·rot·ic

(nū-rot'ik),
Relating to or suffering from a neurosis. See: neurosis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neurotic

(no͝o-rŏt′ĭk, nyo͝o-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affected with a neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis. See Usage Note at neurosis.
2. Informal Overanxious: neurotic about punctuality.
n.
1. A person suffering from a neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis.
2. Informal A person who is chronically anxious.

neu·rot′i·cal·ly adv.
The American Heritage® Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2007, 2004 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.

neurotic

adjective Referring to neurosis, see there.
 
noun A person with a neurotic disorder; any person with a mental disorder other than a psychotic disorder.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

neurotic

adjective Referring to neurosis, see there. noun A person with a neurotic disorder; any person with a mental disorder other than a psychotic disorder
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

neu·rot·ic

(nūr-ot'ik)
Relating to or suffering from a neurosis.
See: neurosis
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

Neurotic

Behavior characterized by neurosis, mental functional orders with symptoms such as anxiety, depression, compulsions, and phobias.
Mentioned in: Smelling Disorders
Gale Encyclopedia of Medicine. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Participants were bifurcated into 350 normal, 50 maladjusted, neurotic and psychotic each age ranged from 11 to 80 years with (M=34.44 +- SD=17.34.
Normal (n=30), Maladjusted (n=30), Neurotic (n=30) and Psychotic (n=50).
Table-II: Split Half Reliability (n=500) and Group Wise Normal (n=350) Maladjusted, Neurotic and Psychotic (n=50) each for Modified Hand test.
When comparison of photographs showing special states of psychological conditions was made, judgments of subjects revealed non significant difference between psychotics, neurotics, and normal.
If the results do not show significant difference between the judgment and assessment of the subject about the facial expressions shown in the photographs it means that the normal are rated as normals with the same confidence as the psychotics and neurotics are rated.
The present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the facial expression and the mental state of psychotics, neurotics, and normal.
People with severe PDs, if I am correct, are more prone to addiction than are "nice neurotics" for the following reasons: 1) They have more Adversities (As) and disturbed Consequences (Cs) than the rest of us neurotics; 2) They axe therefore more frustrated than non-PDs; 3) Because of their greater and often overwhelming frustrations, many of them develop unusual degrees of LFT; 4) Because of their greater failures and rejections, many of them also develop neurotic self-damnation about their deficits, handicaps, and failings; 5) Some of them, for biological reasons, may be more prone than neurotics to demand that they must not be frustrated and must perform well.
To make matters still worse, if all that I have just stated is even partially true, individuals with the dual diagnosis of addiction and PD will tend to addict themselves more often than neurotics, have more severe addictions (such as to barbiturates and heroin), and be more resistant to giving up their addictions.
3) Conversion reaction patients will score significantly lower on Socialization scale as compared to other neurotics.
4) Conversion reaction patients will score significantly lower on Self Control scale as compared to other neurotics.
Niebauer's goals are much more modest and, by his own definition, much more achievable: "Rather than "going for nirvana" this book is about experiencing a slight shift in perspective one might call the neurotic's alternative to enlightenment, but this slight shift may be enough.
The Neurotic's Guide to Avoiding Enlightenment succeeds in its goal of providing a reasoned assessment of reality, illusion, ego and self; probing the process behind the psyche's development and perceptions and offering readers much food for thought and illumination.