neurotic

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neurotic

 [noo͡-rot´ik]
1. pertaining to or characterized by neurosis.
2. a person affected with a neurosis.
neurotic disorder neurosis.

neu·rot·ic

(nū-rot'ik),
Relating to or suffering from a neurosis. See: neurosis.

neurotic

/neu·rot·ic/ (ndbobr-rot´ik)
1. pertaining to or characterized by a neurosis.
2. a person affected with a neurosis.

neurotic

(no͝o-rŏt′ĭk, nyo͝o-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affected with a neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis. See Usage Note at neurosis.
2. Informal Overanxious: neurotic about punctuality.
n.
1. A person suffering from a neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis.
2. Informal A person who is chronically anxious.

neu·rot′i·cal·ly adv.

neurotic

[n(y)oo͡rot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + osis, condition; L, icus, like
1 adj, pertaining to neurosis.
2 adj, pertaining to the nerves.
3 n, one who is afflicted with a neurosis.
4 n,
Usage notes: (informal)
an emotionally unstable person.

neurotic

adjective Referring to neurosis, see there.
 
noun A person with a neurotic disorder; any person with a mental disorder other than a psychotic disorder.

neurotic

adjective Referring to neurosis, see there. noun A person with a neurotic disorder; any person with a mental disorder other than a psychotic disorder

neu·rot·ic

(nūr-ot'ik)
Relating to or suffering from a neurosis.
See: neurosis

Neurotic

Behavior characterized by neurosis, mental functional orders with symptoms such as anxiety, depression, compulsions, and phobias.
Mentioned in: Smelling Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
When comparison of photographs showing special states of psychological conditions was made, judgments of subjects revealed non significant difference between psychotics, neurotics, and normal.
If the results do not show significant difference between the judgment and assessment of the subject about the facial expressions shown in the photographs it means that the normal are rated as normals with the same confidence as the psychotics and neurotics are rated.
The present study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the facial expression and the mental state of psychotics, neurotics, and normal.
In this way, 15 photographs (stimulus presentation) which clearly showed psychotic, neurotic, and normal features were selected, yielding to five facial expressions in each following category:
To make matters still worse, if all that I have just stated is even partially true, individuals with the dual diagnosis of addiction and PD will tend to addict themselves more often than neurotics, have more severe addictions (such as to barbiturates and heroin), and be more resistant to giving up their addictions.
Other addict's such as some gamblers and potheads seem to be mainly neurotic, and have abysmal low frustration tolerance (LFT).
When people learn - and invent - these iBs, which at times all of them seem to do, they create neurotic Consequences (Cs) that take the form of self-defeating thoughts (e.
Like just about all of us humans, individuals with severe PD are also neurotic or self-defeating.
4) Conversion reaction patients will score significantly lower on Self Control scale as compared to other neurotics.
5) Conversion reaction patients will score significantly higher on Sociability scale as compared to other neurotics.
One group consisted of fifteen conversion reaction patients and the second group had fifteen neurotic patients which included anxiety neurotics, reactive depressives, and obsessive compulsives.
The hypotheses regarding levels of Anxiety between the conversion reaction patients and other neurotics did not yield any significant differences.