neuroticism


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neu·rot·i·cism

(nū-rot'i-sizm),
The condition or psychological trait of being neurotic.

neuroticism

(nū-rŏt′ĭ-sĭzm) [″ + -ismos, condition]
A condition or trait of neurosis.

neuroticism

The state of a person persistently and excessively prone to anxiety and to a preoccupation with self rather than with the external world. Neuroticism often involves HYPOCHONDRIASIS. See also NEUROSIS.

neuroticism

one of the big five personality factors, characterized by a tendency to be tense, anxious and moody.
References in periodicals archive ?
5th percentile for Neuroticism ("probably remain calm, even in tense situations").
The NEO-FFI-3 gathered data related to five personality domains: Neuroticism (M= 2.
The Big Five traits (extraversion, agreeableness, conscientiousness, neuroticism, and openness) have been related to a wide range of behaviors (Ozer and Benet-Martinez, 2006).
As seen in table 1; the highest mean is related to irrational beliefs (284/640) and the lowest one is related to neuroticism (21/1).
Additionally, due to the aforementioned tendency of individuals with BPD to be high in neuroticism (Morey and Zanarini 2000), as well as neuroticism's previously observed relationship with disgust sensitivity (Quigley et al.
Innes and Kitto (1989) found that teachers who demonstrated high neuroticism were more likely to suffer from stress.
Both models reveal that visual acuity at logMAR [less than or equal to] 1 and neuroticism were independently associated with difficulty with near and distance activities.
H1: Dispositional factors of general stress, academic motivation, self-efficacy, openness, conscientiousness, extraversion, agreeableness, neuroticism and social support will influence self-esteem
Nevertheless, because of the low internal consistency of the psychoticism measure, only the extraversion and neuroticism subscale scores were used in subsequent analyses.
Mills and Huebner (1998) reported that among school psychologists greater extraversion and agreeableness, and less neuroticism seemed to reduce emotional exhaustion.
Neuroticism (N): Individuals high on N are prone to experience negative emotions such as depression, anxiety or anger and tend to be impulsive and self conscious (McCrae & Costa 1987).
The neuroticism domain is considered a measure of one's disposition towards psychological distress, whereas extraversion is thought to capture a broad range of positive traits such as activity, sociability, and the tendency towards pleasure and joy (Costa & McCrae, 1992b).