neurotic


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neurotic

 [noo͡-rot´ik]
1. pertaining to or characterized by neurosis.
2. a person affected with a neurosis.
neurotic disorder neurosis.

neu·rot·ic

(nū-rot'ik),
Relating to or suffering from a neurosis. See: neurosis.

neurotic

(no͝o-rŏt′ĭk, nyo͝o-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affected with a neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis. See Usage Note at neurosis.
2. Informal Overanxious: neurotic about punctuality.
n.
1. A person suffering from a neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis.
2. Informal A person who is chronically anxious.

neu·rot′i·cal·ly adv.

neurotic

adjective Referring to neurosis, see there.
 
noun A person with a neurotic disorder; any person with a mental disorder other than a psychotic disorder.

neurotic

adjective Referring to neurosis, see there. noun A person with a neurotic disorder; any person with a mental disorder other than a psychotic disorder

neu·rot·ic

(nūr-ot'ik)
Relating to or suffering from a neurosis.
See: neurosis

Neurotic

Behavior characterized by neurosis, mental functional orders with symptoms such as anxiety, depression, compulsions, and phobias.
Mentioned in: Smelling Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
Integrating Neurotic Media's technology and innovations into Peloton's platform will bring unprecedented functionality to members, enhancing their experience.
Table-II shows split half reliabilities of normal, malad-justed, neurotic, psychotic and overall.
The task of trying to define neurosis, as revealed by clinical experience, in terms of the comprehension of the concept of neurosis, tends to become indistinguishable from the psycho-analytic theory itself, in that this theory was basically constituted as a theory of neurotic conflict and its modes.
But it's possible that people who are neurotic are more likely to pay attention to their health and report a problem to the doctor.
It could explain why so many original thinkers, such as the famously neurotic Vincent Van Gogh, suffered for their art.
Conclusion: It was concluded that the fathers of neurotic children have high sten scores on depression than the fathers of psychotic children.
"In the Senate, there are neurotic individuals," she said.
Niebauer's goals are much more modest and, by his own definition, much more achievable: "Rather than "going for nirvana" this book is about experiencing a slight shift in perspective one might call the neurotic's alternative to enlightenment, but this slight shift may be enough.
In the light of above theoretical background and research review for present study, the following hypotheses were formulated: 1) Fathers of neurotic children will have high anxiety sten scores than the fathers of normal children; 2) Fathers of psychotic children will have low anxiety sten scores than the fathers of neurotic children; 3) Fathers of normal children will have less anxiety sten scores than the fathers of psychotic children.
In particular, Skirbekk notes the decline in childbearing among neurotic men-neurotic meaning individuals who tend to be moody and emotional.
As for the Grand Emperor of Neurotics, Woody Allen (and David's director in the 2009 film Whatever Works), the two men's public personas could hardly be more different.
The meaning of the two core terms in many ways mirrors the two different focuses brought upon the subject by doctors/psychotherapists who follow the medical model (and focus almost exclusively on Neurotic Anxiety) and existential philosophers and practitioners who use a phenomenological approach (focusing on Existential Anxiety, while acknowledging its vital relationship with Neurotic Anxiety).