neurotic


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neurotic

 [noo͡-rot´ik]
1. pertaining to or characterized by neurosis.
2. a person affected with a neurosis.
neurotic disorder neurosis.

neu·rot·ic

(nū-rot'ik),
Relating to or suffering from a neurosis. See: neurosis.

neurotic

/neu·rot·ic/ (ndbobr-rot´ik)
1. pertaining to or characterized by a neurosis.
2. a person affected with a neurosis.

neurotic

(no͝o-rŏt′ĭk, nyo͝o-)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or affected with a neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis. See Usage Note at neurosis.
2. Informal Overanxious: neurotic about punctuality.
n.
1. A person suffering from a neurosis. No longer used in psychiatric diagnosis.
2. Informal A person who is chronically anxious.

neu·rot′i·cal·ly adv.

neurotic

[n(y)oo͡rot′ik]
Etymology: Gk, neuron + osis, condition; L, icus, like
1 adj, pertaining to neurosis.
2 adj, pertaining to the nerves.
3 n, one who is afflicted with a neurosis.
4 n,
Usage notes: (informal)
an emotionally unstable person.

neurotic

adjective Referring to neurosis, see there.
 
noun A person with a neurotic disorder; any person with a mental disorder other than a psychotic disorder.

neurotic

adjective Referring to neurosis, see there. noun A person with a neurotic disorder; any person with a mental disorder other than a psychotic disorder

neu·rot·ic

(nūr-ot'ik)
Relating to or suffering from a neurosis.
See: neurosis

Neurotic

Behavior characterized by neurosis, mental functional orders with symptoms such as anxiety, depression, compulsions, and phobias.
Mentioned in: Smelling Disorders
References in periodicals archive ?
But it's possible that people who are neurotic are more likely to pay attention to their health and report a problem to the doctor.
Personality expert Dr Adam Perkins, from King's College London, said: "We're still a long way off from fully explaining neuroticism, and we're not offering all of the answers, but we hope that our new theory will help people make sense of their own experiences, and show that although being highly neurotic is by definition unpleasant, it also has creative benefits.
This study was undertaken in order to investigate the vulnerability to depression in fathers of neurotic and psychotic children.
In the light of above theoretical background and research review for present study, the following hypotheses were formulated: 1) Fathers of neurotic children will have high anxiety sten scores than the fathers of normal children; 2) Fathers of psychotic children will have low anxiety sten scores than the fathers of neurotic children; 3) Fathers of normal children will have less anxiety sten scores than the fathers of psychotic children.
Figure 1 summarises the key features of Existential and Neurotic Anxiety, together with illustrative quotes from a wide range of authors, philosophers and practitioners.
A lot of his short stories are populated with a nightclub feel and cool characters--along with a bunch of neurotic ones, of course.
Also in literature, we could not find the data regarding correlation analysis between neurotic and clinical-laboratory indexes of the disease.
Although Horney's language of neurotic trends belongs to an earlier time and a particular theoretical perspective, current therapists may benefit from her insights by thinking of these trends as interpersonal or relational patterns.
Ego was": a neurotic in its bedroom/frightened to be the warden/of all the mountains in China.
Namely, he wants to bring in Tracy Jordan (Tracy Morgan), a neurotic movie star -- any resemblance to Martin Lawrence is purely not actionable enough -- Jack happened to have met once.
My rat got so frustrated when he couldn't get any food by pushing that he developed a neurotic ritual: He would turn to the left three times while throwing his little ratty head around and then sort of fall over backward.
Bette's unhappy experiences with her father gave her a neurotic, insecure attitude towards men and, unsurprisingly, none of her four marriages was successful.