neurosyphilis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

neurosyphilis

 [noor″o-sif´ĭ-lis]
the central nervous system manifestations of tertiary syphilis, which may be divided into two groups, asymptomatic and symptomatic; see also general paresis and tabes dorsalis.
Miller-Keane Encyclopedia and Dictionary of Medicine, Nursing, and Allied Health, Seventh Edition. © 2003 by Saunders, an imprint of Elsevier, Inc. All rights reserved.

neu·ro·syph·i·lis

(nū'rō-sif'i-lis),
Infection of the central nervous system by Treponema pallidum (syphilis); there are several subdivisions, including asymptomatic neurosyphilis, meningeal neurosyphilis, meningovascular neurosyphilis, paretic neurosyphilis, and tabetic neurosyphilis.
Farlex Partner Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

neurosyphilis

Any of the rare neurological manifestations of tertiary syphilis.

Clinical findings
Lightning-like pain, ataxia, optic nerve degeneration leading to blindness, urinary incontinence, loss of position sense, neuropathic arthropathy (Charcot joints), personality changes, aphasia, paralysis, seizures. Patients with early syphilis who are co-infected with HIV may not respond to high-dose penicillin G, leading to an increase in Tertiary syphilis.

Clinical forms of neurosyphilis
• Asymptomatic with only a positive VDRL in the CSF.
• General paresis or chronic meningoencephalitis.
• Gummatous.
• Meningovascular or thromboembolic with cerebral infarction or cranial nerve defects.
• Tabes with degeneration of the posterior columns of the spinal cord and nerve roots, decreased peripheral reflexes and proprioceptive sensation, evoking Charcot’s joints.
Segen's Medical Dictionary. © 2012 Farlex, Inc. All rights reserved.

neurosyphilis

Neurology Any of the rare neural changes of 3º syphilis Clinical Lightning-like pain, ataxia, optic nerve degeneration → blindness, urinary incontinence, loss of position sense, Charcot's joints, personality changes, aphasia, paralysis, seizures. See STS-RPR, VDRL. See Charcot's joints, Windswept cortex, Tabes dorsalis. Cf Quaternary syphilis.
McGraw-Hill Concise Dictionary of Modern Medicine. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

neu·ro·syph·i·lis

(nūr'ō-sif'i-lis)
Infection of the central nervous system by Treponema pallidum.
Medical Dictionary for the Health Professions and Nursing © Farlex 2012

neurosyphilis

Any syphilitic infection of the nervous system. This is usually a late (tertiary) manifestation of untreated SYPHILIS, but may occur in adolescence. Its effects are widespread and include TABES DORSALIS, general paralysis of the insane (general paresis or GPI), dementia and involvement of the blood vessels of the brain and the brain coverings (meningovascular syphilis).
Collins Dictionary of Medicine © Robert M. Youngson 2004, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, recovery from neurosyphilis is contingent on the severity of the disease before it was detected and treated.
Neurosyphilis is a spirochete infection which involves central nervous system and caused by Treponema pallidum.
Hence we repeated his VDRL with serial dilution and it was positive too, confirming the Diagnosis of Neurosyphilis. He was started on Penicillin and steroids.
We found disparities in ocular syphilis trends by clinical phenotype and evidence of neurosyphilis on CSF analysis during the 4-year study period.
All ocular syphilis cases should be considered as a type of neurosyphilis. In a study of Dai T et al among 25 HIV negative ocular syphilis cases, CSF abnormalities were found in 72% of patients: 60.0% had elevated white blood cell counts, 52.0% had elevated protein levels, and 36.0 % had reactive CSF Venereal Disease Research Laboratory (VDRL) test [4].
Such therapy options include 100 mg PO BID doxycycline for 28 days or ceftriaxone 2 g IV or IM daily for 10-14 days if desensitization to penicillin is not possible, but there are limited data for the efficacy of these alternative therapies when there is evidence of neurosyphilis [13].
A consequence of the syphilis epidemic among men who have sex with men (MSM): Neurosyphilis in Los Angeles, 2001-2004.
Tertiary syphilis develops 3 to 15 years after the initial infection, and is caused by spread of the bacterium to other parts of the body, in particular the skin, mucous membranes, liver, eyes, joints, bones, muscles, cardiovascular system, or central nervous system (referred to as neurosyphilis).
The tertiary stage is subdivided into three general categories: gummatous syphilis, followed by cardiovascular syphilis and finally neurosyphilis.[sup][3] In particular, tertiary syphilis often mimics cancer, because it frequently presents as a space-occupying lesion in visceral organs.[sup][3],[4]