neurosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to neurosis: psychoneurosis, neurotic disorder

neurosis

 [noo͡-ro´sis] (pl. neuro´ses)
former name for a category of mental disorders characterized by anxiety and avoidance behavior. In general, the term has been used to refer to disorders in which the symptoms are distressing to the person, reality testing does not yield unusual results, behavior does not violate gross social norms, and there is no apparent organic etiology. Such disorders are currently classified as anxiety disorders, dissociative disorders, mood disorders, sexual disorders, and somatoform disorders.
anxiety neurosis an obsolete term (Freud) for conditions now reclassified as panic disorder and generalized anxiety disorder.
hysterical neurosis a former classification of mental disorders, now divided into conversion disorder and dissociative disorders.
obsessive-compulsive neurosis former name for obsessive-compulsive disorder.
prison neurosis chronophobia occurring in prisoners having trouble adjusting to a long prison sentence, characterized by feelings of restlessness, panic, anxiety, and claustrophobia.
transference neurosis a phenomenon occurring in most psychoanalyses, in which the patient undergoes, with the analyst as the object, an intense repetition of childhood conflicts, reexperiencing impulses, feelings, and fantasies that originally developed in relation to the parent.

neu·ro·sis

, pl.

neu·ro·ses

(nū-rō'sis, -sēz),
1. A psychological or behavioral disorder in which anxiety is the primary characteristic; defense mechanisms or any phobias are the adjustive techniques that a person learns to cope with this underlying anxiety. In contrast to the psychoses, people with a neurosis do not exhibit gross distortion of reality or gross disorganization of personality but in severe cases, those affected may be as disabled as those with a psychosis.
2. A functional nervous disease, or one in which there is no evident lesion.
3. A peculiar state of tension or irritability of the nervous system; any form of nervousness.
Synonym(s): neurotic disorder
[neuro- + G. -osis, condition]

neurosis

(no͝o-rō′sĭs, nyo͝o-)
n. pl. neuro·ses (-sēz)
A mild mental disorder characterized by excessive anxiety, insecurity, or obsession, usually compensated for by various defense mechanisms.

neurosis

Psychology An older term for a disorder characterized by excess anxiety and avoidance behaviors Neuroses Anxiety disorder, dissociative disorder, mood disorder, personality disorder, bipolar I disorder, depression, histrionic personality disorder, obsessive-compulsive behavior, phobias. See Neurotic disorder, Semi-starvation neurosis, Sunday neurosis.

neu·ro·sis

, pl. neuroses (nūr-ō'sis, -sēz)
1. A psychological or behavioral disorder in which anxiety is the primary characteristic; defense mechanisms or any of the phobias are the adjustive techniques that a person learns to cope with this underlying anxiety. In contrast to the psychoses, people with a neurosis do not exhibit gross distortion of reality or disorganization of personality.
2. A functional nervous disease, or one for which there is no evident lesion.
3. A peculiar state of tension or irritability of the nervous system; any form of nervousness.
Synonym(s): neurotic disorder, psychoneurosis.
[neuro- + G. -osis, condition]

neurosis

Any long-term mental or behavioural disorder, in which contact with reality is retained and the condition is recognized by the sufferer as abnormal. Attempts have been made to prohibit the term as pejorative and insulting but these have failed mainly because of a more complete and humane understanding of the subject and of the plight of neurotic sufferers. A neurosis essentially features anxiety or behaviour exaggeratedly designed to avoid anxiety. Defence mechanisms against anxiety take various forms and may appear as PHOBIAS, OBSESSIONS, COMPULSIONS or as sexual dysfunctions. In recent attempts at classification, the disorders formerly included under the neuroses have, possibly for reasons of political correctness, been given new names. The general term, neurosis, is now called anxiety disorder; hysteria has become a somatoform or conversion disorder; amnesia, fugue, multiple personality and depersonalization have become dissociative disorders; and neurotic depression has become a dysthymic disorder. These changes are helpful and explanatory but ignore the futility of euphemism. Psychoanalysis has proved of little value in curing these conditions and Freud's speculations as to their origins are not now widely accepted outside Freudian schools of thought. Neurotic disorders are probably best regarded as being the result of inappropriate early programming. Cognitive behaviour therapy seems effective in some cases.

neu·ro·sis

, pl. neuroses (nūr-ō'sis, -sēz)
1. Psychological or behavioral disorder with anxiety as primary characteristic; affected patients may be as disabled as those with a psychosis.
2. A functional nervous disease, or one in which there is no evident lesion.
3. A peculiar state of tension or irritability of the nervous system.
References in periodicals archive ?
While I am suggesting these novels can open such a reconceptualization, via neurosis, I am also aware of their profoundly equivocal form, both in relation to Lerner's own "project" and in relation to the contemporary realities that they attempt to grasp.
Cuando esta sustitucion se hace posible, y se realiza con fuerza y predominio se esta ante el terreno de las neurosis; sin embargo, en aquellas ocasiones en las que se rechaza el principio de realidad y hay predominio del principio de placer, se esta ante el terreno de la psicosis.
Esa hipotesis traumatica no sobrevivio a la critica del tiempo y quedo restringida al campo de lo que llamariamos las neurosis simples, surgidas en una conmocion vital.
Walker is making the motion platform chair at the heart of Neurosis open source and hopes it will inspire school children to get involved with engineering and science projects.
Aunque en esa epoca ya Lacan y otros psicoanalistas consideraban el triptico psicopatologico en cuestion desde la perspectiva freudiana, seria Laplanche el vulgarizador de la idea, al presentar bajo el titulo de Neurosis, psicosis y perversion un recuento de escritos de Freud (1973).
Habiendo aislado el factor etiologico, se propone ahora examinar los dos estados patologicos nerviosos que causa--los que bien podriamos llamar enfermedades de la civilizacion-: las neurosis actuales y las psiconeurosis, de las que ya se habia ocupado durante anos en su investigacion, y que constituia por entonces su propuesta nosologica, su aporte, digamoslo asi, al campo de la clinica psiquiatrica.
Una de las primeras noticias de este nuevo fenomeno se comienza a constatar ya en el ano 1938 cuando el psicoanalista Adolf Stern (citado por Gunderson, 2002) "identifico un subgrupo de pacientes que no encajaban en los limites habituales de la psicoterapia ni en el sistema clasificatorio de la epoca, un sistema centrado basicamente en la division entre psicosis y neurosis" (Pag.
En la genesis de la neurosis esta el proceso de represion y su motor es la angustia frente a una perdida inminente.
"Torment me, but don't abandon me"; psychoanalysis of the severe neurosis in a new key.
Cuando Maurice Ravel compuso su famoso Bolero, en 1928, Freud, Jung y otros psicoanalistas habian conmovido la medicina y el arte del siglo XX, pero Ravel no penso que el Boleto seria utilizado como metafora de algunas alteraciones de la conducta humana; sobre todo de aquellos padecimientos funcionales del sistema nervioso que hemos dado en llamar neurosis y que se caracterizan por la inestabilidad emocional y la repeticion.
While an onlooker can see the limits of a neurosis, the creative spirit is capable of harvesting new potatoes out of tilled land.
El concepto de neurosis ha sido problematico desde su creacion en 1769.