neuroscientist


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neuroscientist

A researcher, often with an advanced degree–MD, MS, PhD–who investigates neural and brain-related phenomena
References in periodicals archive ?
Greenfield's sentiments were made four years after she published 'Mind Change: How Digital Technologies Are Leaving Their Mark on Our Brains.' In her book, the neuroscientist asserts that children who used social media and played on digital tablets were more likely to develop depression and low self-esteem, along with the possibility of narcissism.
"A lot of neuroscientists have theories they cannot prove," he said, but this could provide a whole new way for them to verify or falsify what we think we know about the human brain.
Neuroscientists at NYU Langone Medical Center in a presentation prepared for the Society for Neuroscience annual meeting in Washington, D.C., researchers say their experimental results suggest how diets with fewer calories derived from carbohydrates likely deter some aspects of aging and chronic diseases in mammals, including humans, Fars news agency reported.
Emphasizing that the trial judge's assessment of the reliability of expert testimony is entitled to "broad latitude," the appellate court determined that "the bases underlying [the neuroscientist's] conclusions were tenuous at best." The court contended that this report was premised in large part on the notion that the defendant suffered from "Major Depression." The court, however, asserted that this conclusion was not supported by the defendant's medical records nor established by the other two experts.
Neuroscientist Dean is now in the final year of his PhD research and wants to continue with both an academic career and with comedy.
The first neuroscientist emphasizes the fabulous complexity of the processes that give rise to consciousness.
Potential disputes over age-relative consciousness are apparently somewhat moot for psychologist and neuroscientist Robert R.
That was the case made by Princeton philosopher and neuroscientist Joshua Greene, whose snazzy presentation, illustrated with slides of pop culture images, was titled "Dueling Dualisms" but could have been called "Punishment Without Guilt." Greene noted that in all the debates about whether to blame the guilty person or his damaged brain, we assume some nonphysical core self--a soul--that makes moral judgments.
Read Montague, a neuroscientist (brain scientist) at Baylor University in Texas, had volunteers drink from unlabeled cups of Coke and Pepsi.
27 with Sally Shaywitz, the pediatrician and neuroscientist who wrote Overcoming Dyslexia (Knopf, 2003).
A number of volunteers were scanned as they blindly drank Coke or Pepsi for neuroscientist Read Montague of the Baylor College of Medicine in Houston, Texas.
The world faces a brain disease "time bomb" in ageing populations, a leading neuroscientist said yesterday.