neuroplasticity


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neuroplasticity

(no͝or′ō-plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē, nyo͝or′-)
n.
The ability of the brain to change in structure or function in response to experience.

neu′ro·plas′tic (-plăs′tĭk) adj.

neuroplasticity

[-plastis′itē]
the capacity of the nervous system for adaptation or regeneration after trauma.

neuroplasticity

(nūr″ō-plăs-tĭs′ĭ-tē)
The ability of the nervous system to adapt to trauma or disease; the ability of nerve cells to grow and form new connections to other neurons.
References in periodicals archive ?
They are based on well known techniques and behavioral modification practices encompassed by cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT), mindfulness and neuroplasticity.
While recent brain research assures that neuroplasticity continues throughout a lifetime, the bad news is that it takes more effort and sustained practice to change the brains of adults as compared to children.
The first four chapters of the book provide theoretical foundations, review the literature regarding specific instructional techniques for those with acquired cognitive impairments, consider contextual factors in enhancing neuroplasticity and introduce the PIE schema.
begins with a review of basic principles of neuroscience and descriptions of physiological techniques, neuroimaging, neuroplasticity and research regarding physiologically based interventions.
Research on neuroplasticity may have implications for understanding schizophrenia, autism, bipolar disorder, pain syndromes and many other conditions that induce brain adaptations.
They discuss the effects of various diets on metabolic changes in visceral organs and the brain, focusing on the Western diet, Mediterranean diet, ketogenic diets, n-3 fatty acids, homocysteine levels, polyphenols, and table salt; the effects of diet and exercise on major depression, diabetic retinopathy, age-induced impairments, cognitive function, dementia, Alzheimer's disease, neural plasticity, the aging brain, neuronal survival, anxiety disorders, neurodegenerative diseases, and neuroplasticity and growth factors in adolescence; and the role of sleep and its interaction with exercise.
Raskin (psychology and neuroscience, Trinity College) offers graduate students and rehabilitation professionals 14 chapters on neuroplasticity and rehabilitation.
The contributors address such topics as neuromaturation and neuroplasticity of the central auditory system; language-based assessment and intervention of APD; and interpretation of APD test results.
He is best known for his work to elucidate the molecular adaptations and neurocircuitry that underlie addiction, with a focus on characterizing the neuroplasticity produced by chronic use of addictive drugs in the prefrontal cortex and its glutamatergic projections to the striatum.
His topics include nervous systems and brains, chemistry and life, genes and the history of molecular biology, how neurons generate signals, neuroanatomy and excitability, psychoactive drugs, neural development and neuroplasticity, sensory perception, tongue and taste, eyes and vision, imaging the brain, memory, and emotion.
present the first text on recovery of function and neurorehabilitation in multiple sclerosis, focusing on mechanisms of recovery, application of neuroplasticity to therapeutic interventions, and determination of their efficacy.