neuropeptides


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neuropeptides

peptides formed and released by groups of neurons within the central nervous system, that act on other neuron populations. Comparable to neurotransmitters, often made within the same cells, but acting via different types of specific receptors. Many have been recognized, of which better known examples are enkephalins, serotonin and neuropeptide Y. They have extensive influences, for example on mood and behaviour, pain and analgesia, appetite and the immune system. See also endorphins.

neuropeptides (ner·ō·pepˑ·tīdz),

n.pl endogenous protein molecules that influence neural activity by carrying information directly to the cells and tissues. Included are VP, CCK, substance P, enkephalins, and endorphins.
References in periodicals archive ?
Effect of exposure to volatile organic compounds on plasma levels of neuropeptides, nerve growth factor, and histamine in patients with self-reported multiple chemical sensitivity.
The importance of another appetite-related neuropeptide NPY in hypothalamic regulatory activities has been already identified.
Effects of microinjections of the neuropeptide substance P in the dorsal periaqueductal gray on the behaviour of rats in the plus-maze test.
Role of CRF and other neuropeptides in stress-induced reinstatement of drug seeking.
The researchers observed that those neuropeptides that bring increased appetite with decreased energy expenditure were increased in the hypothalamus, while the neuropeptides that reduce appetite and increase energy expenditure were decreased.
These genes encode neuropeptides that are known to regulate growth, feeding behavior, hormonal processes, neurotransmission, and reproduction (Geraerts et al.
These findings identify Ucn II and human URP as a new members of the CRF family of neuropeptides, which are expressed centrally and bind to CRF-R2.
This covers cellular and humoral immunity, and the function of cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, complement and neuropeptides.
Neuropeptides have been detected in the prostate of several species (mice, hamster, guinea pig, rabbit, rat and man); these substances might be also related to the growth, maintenance and function of the prostate.
Even when a patient's itch does not have a primary inflammatory etiology, inflammation can develop in response to itch through neuropeptides.
Neuropeptides released from the lower airways may also induce symptoms in the other end of the airway system and vice versa.
Insel's research at NIMH into the complex social behaviors of animals demonstrated the importance of the neuropeptides oxytocin and vasopressin in maternal behavior, pair bond formation, and aggression.